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eswube
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 14th, 2016, 3:42 pm
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Nice design. :)


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Hood
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 14th, 2016, 3:51 pm
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A very neat idea and a very sleek looking fighter.

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Skyder2598
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 14th, 2016, 8:07 pm
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Great work ;-)

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Avatar: Normerr, summer 2016, Military police officer
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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 19th, 2016, 11:23 am
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Hi everyone, here we have the first real Venezuelan warship, it is also my first sailing ship.

Independecia Class
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The Independencia class was a type of eight 28-gun frigates of the Venezuelan Navy, each with a main battery of 20 x 12-pounder long guns, and with 8 x 6-pounders on the quarterdeck. Independencia was launched in 1809, one of fourteen original frigates authorized for construction by Parliament in 1808 and the first constructed. After the Revolution started, Venezuela needed warships. Parliament authorized the construction of a navy, but in the meantime needed warships immediately. The quickest way to obtain warships was to arm merchant ships. This tactic worked, at least to some degree, because most merchant ships were able to hold the weight of a battery of guns on their decks. Arming merchant ships allowed the creation of two categories of warship: sloops-of-war and two-deckers. Smaller merchant vessels capable of carrying a battery on their main deck provided a useful source of sloops-of-war. Larger vessels, especially East Indiamen intended to carry cargos to the Orient, were armed as two-deckers. Indeed, due to the dangers on the Indies passage, most East Indiamen were in any case built as auxiliary warships so that they could defend themselves from pirates. However, neither type of merchantman made entirely satisfactory warships. Merchant vessels’ scantlings were lighter than warships’, and converted merchantmen were able to take less damage and had to carry lighter guns. The larger merchant conversions, although frequently referred to as frigates, really were not up to the designation. Nevertheless, converting merchant ships did provide a navy. Parliament hastened the creation of this force by purchasing and converting extra merchant craft. It continued the practice throughout the war, whenever it needed warships in a hurry. While purchasing ships gave Venezuela a navy, the Government realized the limitations of the purchased ships. Real warships were needed. On December 13, 1808, the naval committee recommended construction of 14 frigates – eight of 28 guns and six of 32 guns. Construction was to begin in January, 1808, with ships to be completed and fitted out for sea by March. These frigates were intended to carry a main battery of 12lb long guns with six-pounders on the upper works. A nation in the process of creating itself, Venezuela had difficulties finding armament for these ships. As a result, ships’ batteries were often irregular. Some went to sea carrying a mixed battery of 12lb and 18lb guns on its main deck and nine-pounders on its upper works.

Class overview
Name: Independencia
Builders: Puerto Cabello, Barcelona, Maracaibo & Cumaná
Operators: Venezuelan Navy
Planned: 8
Completed: 8

General characteristics
Type: frigate
Displacement: 750 tonnes
Length: 55 m
Beam: 11.2 m
Draught: 4.54 m
Armament:
28 guns:
20 × 12-pdr long guns
8 × 6-pdr long guns

Armour: Timber

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eswube
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 20th, 2016, 11:02 am
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Good work.


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Hood
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: August 21st, 2016, 9:38 am
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As a first sailing ship attempt that looks very fine work. Actually I'm quite jealous as I haven't even had the courage to mess with rigging at all.

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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: September 9th, 2016, 11:53 am
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Thanks guys, im not surprised you dont want to mess with the rigging Hood, it took me longer to make the rigging than the entire ship.

Arapiles Class Battleship
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The Arapiles class was a class of four super-dreadnought battleships built by the Spanish Navy. The class comprised Arapiles, San Luis, Hércules, and Argonauta. Construction started on the ships shortly before World War I; Arapiles was laid down in 1913, Hércules and San Luis followed in 1914, and Argonauta, the final ship, was laid down in 1915.

Class overview
Operators: Spanish navy
In commission: 1915–46
Planned: 4
Completed: 4
Lost: 0

General characteristics
Type: Battleship
Displacement: 36,500 tonnes full load
Length: 201.96 m (Total)
Beam: 30 m
Draft: 8.03 m
Installed power: 75,500 shp
Propulsion: 4 × Parsons turbines, 4 shafts, 24 boilers
Speed: 23 knots
Range: 5,000 nmi (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph)
Complement: 1,187–1,271
Armament:

8 × 15 in guns
12 × 6 in guns
10 × 3 in guns
2 × single 60 cm (24 in) torpedo tubes (below waterline)

Armor:

Belt: 170–350 mm (6.7–13.8 in)
Conning tower: 400 mm (16 in)
Deck: 60 mm–100 mm (2.3–3.9 in)
Turrets: 350 mm–100 mm (13.8–3.9 in)

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Oberon_706
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: September 9th, 2016, 1:19 pm
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Great Work! Do those casemate guns have enough freeboard above the waterline to remain dry in a seaway? many of the dreadnoughts had issues in this area.

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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: September 9th, 2016, 1:30 pm
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Oberon_706 wrote:
Great Work! Do those casemate guns have enough freeboard above the waterline to remain dry in a seaway? many of the dreadnoughts had issues in this area.
Well the guns are not over the water, there is about 2 meters of deck that might limit their movement and they are a bit close to the waterline so if the sea is a bit rough there might be some flooding, i hope thats what you meant.

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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: United States of VenezuelaPosted: October 22nd, 2016, 1:39 pm
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The Trujillo-class aircraft carriers were a class of light carriers built for the Venezuelan Navy during World War II. Unlike previous carriers, they were based on cruiser hulls. However, they differed from the earlier light carriers in that they were built from the keel up as carriers, and were based on heavy rather than light cruiser hulls. Completed too late for the war, they served as carriers until the mid-1950s. The Trujillo class was based on the hull and machinery of the 27.000-ton Aragua-class heavy cruiser hull, allowing better seakeeping, improved hull subdivision, enhanced protection, greater magazine volume, a stronger flight deck, an expanded air group and a slightly higher speed than in the Independence class. Compared to their light cruiser half-sisters, they were eight feet wider in beam to accommodate the size and weight of the hangar and flight deck.

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