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Hood
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: February 2nd, 2020, 10:35 am
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Amazing work, and that's not hyperbole.
I know what hard work goes into making carrier 3-view drawings, its a lot of work to get everything to line up well and even carrier top-views can be deceptively complicated to draw.

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eswube
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: February 2nd, 2020, 11:33 am
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Truly fantastic work on these new entries.


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erik_t
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: February 3rd, 2020, 3:27 am
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These are excellent drawings.


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odysseus1980
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: February 3rd, 2020, 8:53 am
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Yes, really fantastic carriers, I like most the Tharian designed ships. Well done GD!


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Morten812
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: February 4th, 2020, 3:31 pm
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Excellent drawings

Minor nitpick on the Treighdin-Class:

Quote 'The next layer of defense was provided by two 24-cell VLS (one starboard forward, one port aft) for a total of 48 R7S missiles. These were a much improved development of Osa-M, with a range of 20 kilometers, a speed of Mach 4, a heavy 40kg warhead and a dual SARH/IRH seeker system similar to Crotale EDIR. Two full sets of reloads are carried in the ship’s magazines, for a total of 144 missiles;'

And the VLS launcher are seen on the top view - but the missiles are not draw above the ship on the side view

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Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: March 23rd, 2020, 3:40 pm
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Thiarian Cruisers and destroyers – modern era

A. Survivors of the Second World War

1. Cruisers

1.1. Oirirceas-Class
Under conditions of the 1948 peace treaty, Thiaria was allowed to keep six cruisers for her postwar fleet, and the Oirirceas-class vessels Spleodar and Ardcheim were the largest of them. Both had served with the Thiarian co-belligerent squadron under Admiral Solcai in the Pacific and taken some damage at Leyte and Okinawa. After returning to Tiaria, they were refurbished from mid-1949 to early 1950 and brought back to an operating condition, but at much reduced capability due to crippling budget restraints. They lost their heavy flak (obsolete anyway) including directors and radars. Main gun directors were fitted with US Mk.13 radars. The Thiarian air search and surface search sets, although obsolescent, remained on board. So did the 37mm quads and their directors, which were fitted with US Mk.28 radars in place of their outdated Thiarian ones. Their boat decks and forward cranes were removed too and replaced with additional superstructure holding C3I, accomodation and office space for command and training duties; the boats were relocated to the former flight deck amidships. The hangars remained on board and were used as cinema and gym. For the next five years, they assumed patrol duties with limited crew and no ammunition for the main guns embarked. During that time, they looked like this:
[ img ]

In 1955, many of the limitations on Thiarian armed forces were lifted. The 37mm quads - which were obsolete and worn out in 1955 - were replaced with 76mm twins of US manufacture (including new Mk.56 directors), who used the former magazines of the 100mm guns. The surface search radar was replaced with an SPS-4 short-range air/surface search unit; the long-range air search set was replaced by a SPS-6. Extensive new communications gear was installed and a helipad was fitted, although the ships were not equipped to carry or service helicopters. The crane was replaced by a smaller one and boat complement was reduced. Both ships still were pure gun cruisers with very limited air defense capabilities. Compared with current foreign developments, they were quite backward, and looked like this:
[ img ]

Further conversion to guided missile cruisers was demanded almost as soon as they were back in service. Plans for a much more complete reconstruction were drafted in 1958/9, while Ardcheim was on a world tour to show Thiaria's somewhat discredited flag again. She visited Argentina, Chile, Koko, Japan, Vietnam, India, Egypt, Italy, France, Portugal, and the USA. When she returned, she was taken in hand for refit to an air-defence missile cruiser. Delivery of modern US missiles was still out of the question, and – lacking alternatives – the Thiarians had to rely on the sole operational alternative, the Swiss RSA missile system, which was to arm the contemporary B-Class destroyers as well. Two twin launchers with two illuminators were installed aft, replacing turret Y. The launchers were fed from two 24-round magazines, built up on deck level and wholly unprotected; reloading was awkward and required a crane, resulting in a pathetically slow rate of fire. The whole bridge structure was replaced with a much more spacious bridge containing modern computer systems and fleet-level command and control facilities. The original optical main gun director was again placed on top of the bridge. A third short lattice mast was erected between the main gun director and the former foremast for the SPS-28 long-range air surveillance radar. A new main mast received a height-finder radar, and a lightweight navigation radar was added. Engines were refurbished and electric power generating capacity increased by 500%. Designed hp fell to 80.000, and speed dropped to 31 knots. Although most ASW gear including the sonar was removed, two triple 400mm torpedo tubes for self-defence were installed amidships. She returned to service in 1962.
[ img ]

Although Ardcheim looked impressive, the RSA was a nightmare to operate and quickly rendered obsolete to the point of uselessness. To improve this situation, the upgraded RSC missile system was ordered from Switzerland for Spleodar (and the second half of the B-class), all other particulars being similar; unlike Ardcheim, Spleodar also received a Thiarian-made bow sonar. Although the RSC was faster and more maneuverable than the RSA, it shared the same inherent limitations (beam-riding guidance and a piss-poorly designed reload system). Refit lasted from 1961 through 1964.
[ img ]

While refit of Ardcheim and Spleodar was underway, the Kennedy administration finally agreed to deliver Terrier missiles and the associated radars and electronics in 1963. The Thiarians needed two years to secure funding; by the time the purchase of two Terrier and six Tartar systems (the latter for the smaller Cuiteamh-class and the B-Class destroyers) was finalized, Ardcheim’s RSA system had been declared non-operational already. Both ships were slated for another reconstruction to integrate Terrier and a SPS-26 3D-radar, starting in 1966 and lasting till 1968; the political situation in Thiaria however killed the project in 1966. No Terrier launcher and only a single SPS-26 set were delivered, and that one was installed on the aircraft carrier Oirion. After rebuild, both ships should have looked like this:
[ img ]

Unfortunately, politics killed this project. By the time Ardcheim was docked and stripped, Thiaria got a left-wing government, which severed all military co-operation with the USA. Ardcheim remained in dockyard hands between 1965 and 1976. Installation of Soviet-supplied Shtorm SAMs was considered in 1970, and declared feasible. Two more systems were ordered in 1973 after intial delivery of four systems for the C-Class destroyers was complete. Again, Thiaria’s turbulent politics of that era undid the plan; the SAM complex was held back after Thiaria’s 1974 refusal to join the OPEC oil embargo against the west, and in 1977, all open contracts with the Soviets were cancelled. Since Ardcheim’s hull was still in decent shape, she was refit as a command ship, receiving a hangar for three Ka-25 helicopters and an Osa-M air defence missile complex, which was license-built in Thiaria since 1971 (and simply copied after 1977, yielding several improved variants). She was re-commissioned in this shape in 1979.
[ img ]

Spleodar soldiered on in her original shape, still toting the useless RSC missiles, till the last C-class destroyer was commissioned in 1980. She was then placed in reserve, and in 1983, she was struck to serve as spare donator for Ardcheim. The latter remained in service as fleet flagship till 1991 (stationary at Abernenui after 1988) and – after being used for trials – was finally scrapped in 1993 at the ripe age of 55. The last remnants of Spleodar’s hull were already broken up by 1990.

1.2. Cuiteamh-Class
LT Cuiteamh (Gaelic: Retribution), LT Contuirt (Gaelic: Adventure) were the sole survivors of their class; although they were Thiaria’s newest cruisers at the end of the war, they remained in Thiaria after the war and were not claimed as prizes. Cuiteamh had been very severely damaged in 1944 and was in yard hands when the war ended; Contuirt was partly disarmed in 1947/8, losing her torpedoes and 20mm cannon and the lateral 130mm turrets. Afterwards, she looked like this:
[ img ]

Repairs to Cuiteamh commenced in 1950, but she was damaged by a yard fire in 1951 and again laid up. Lack of funds prevented further work till 1954. Cuiteamh then was completed as a gun cruiser. All 130mm and 37mm guns were landed; in place of the former, four single Mk.45 automatic 127mm/54 guns and in place of the latter six twin automatic 76mm guns were installed, giving her quite impressive firepower for her age. She also received a completely new superstructure with only one funnel and two lattice masts, one of which carried an old SX radar which had been delivered in 1949 already. Her bridge design resembled contemporary destroyer practice (A-class) was a prototype for all major Thiarian combatants of the 1950s and 1960s, till the C-class destroyers (completed from 1973 through 1980). Apart from the old SX-set, the rest of her electronics gear was high end US equipment. Four sets of French sourced 550mm triple ASW torpedo sets were carried, in place of the old surface torpedo tubes; the wartime vintage sonar suite was retained. The engine plant was removed entirely and replaced by a new 68.000hp steam plant with four times the electric power generation capability; speed dropped to 30 knots. She was the most modern unit of the Thiarian fleet when she returned to service in 1956, but due to structural issues that could never be fully remedied, Cuiteamh never gave very satisfactory service.
[ img ]

Contuirt received a similar refit from 1955 through 1958; afterwards, both units were externally identical. In 1963, the Kennedy administration approved the delivery of two Terrier and six Tartar systems for all four Thiarian cruisers and the four B-class destroyers, and plans were drafted to convert Contuirt and Cuiteamh to missile cruisers toting Tartar and Malafon, to be completed as such in 1968 at the latest:
[ img ]

Due to the political turmoils mentioned above, neither was ever converted. Cuiteamh’s hull was rated structurally unsound as early as 1966, and she was placed in reserve, never to be re-activated. She served as a spares donator for her sister, which was rebuilt to Cadet training ship between 1970 and 1972, receiving more superstructure and an Osa-M SAM complex replacing one of her 127mm guns; the number of 76mm twins was cut to four.
[ img ]

Contuirt lasted in active service till 1984, and became a barracks ship afterwards. As such, she lingered till 2000, when she started to leak. She was scrapped in 2002.

2. Destroyers

2.1. T-Class
Of the 16-unit T-class, seven remained operational after the armistice. One was critically damaged and scrapped in 1947/8, but Taodmhar (Impulsive), Treithiuil (Versatile), Teasai (Hot-tempered), Tairiseach (Loyal), Tapuil (Impetuous) and Taibhsiuil (Stealthy) remained as the backbone of Thiaria’s destroyer fleet in the immediate postwar years. Pennant numbers were painted to the hull sides from 1952. By that time, the Thiarians had re-started destroyer production, but Taodmhar (S197), Teasai (S199), Tairiseach (S202) and Taibhsiuil (S204) were chosen for further modification in 1953. They landed their 130mm twin turrets in favour of two fully automatic 127mm singles from US production, and the 37mm was replaced by a fully automatic 76mm twin. American radars and fire control systems were installed and a tripod main mast was erected. The depth charges were landed, and four triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes - license built French systems - were installed instead. The three eccentrically placed hedgehogs remained on board, and the superstructure was not rebuilt, resulting in a very awkward arrangement of sensor control stations. All four emerged in 1955/7 from the refit.
[ img ]

Although they were not up to date in any way, they remained in service till 1966/69 and were not scrapped before 1980, when the first units of a new generation of ASW frigates became available.

2.2. A-Class
When the war ended, sixteen A-class destroyers were on stocks on four different shipyards all over Thiaria. Having jumped the Axis train just in time and shown some remarkable fighting spirit at Leyte, the Thiarians were treated relatively mildly in the peace treaty, and completion of the newest eight A's was approved by the US as early as 1950. Before construction resumed, the type was completely redesigned to become a state-of-the-art ASW destroyer. Two fully automatic 127mm guns and six automatic 76mm guns made up the new gun armament. A Weapon Alfa automatic depth charge mortar was installed forward, and four triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes amidships. Radar and Fire control was completely US sourced, and the whole superstructure was (unlike the rebuilt T's) tailor-made for to offer enough space for the electronics suite. Construction resumed in 1952, and the eight destroyers were completed between 1955 and 1957. Their names were Ardeirimiuil/S227 (Brilliant), Aigeanta/S228 (Intelligent), Aclai/S229 (Skillful), Aduain/S230 (Extraordinary), Amharach/S231 (Fortunate), Ainscianta/S232 (Furious), Abalta/S233 (Competent) and Anamuil/S234 (Lively). They replaced a mix of 1910s and 1930s vintage vessels which had remained on the navy’s lists without actually being in service.
[ img ]

In this shape, they served faithfully for the next decade. The aft Alfa mount was of little use and landed on most units by 1965; they were all refit with a Thiarian designed radar, signals and ECM suite between 1966 and 1968.
[ img ]

Thiaria's political swing towards the Soviets in the late 60s gave access to modern missile technology the US had been unwilling to share; Aigeanta, Amharach, Ainscianta and Anamuil were converted to antisurface missile destroyers in 1971/2, landing their aft torpedo tubes in lieu of four P-15M Termit (SS-N-2C) launch boxes. The mainmast was modified to carry soviet-sourced ECM systems and a new commo installation, and the remaining Alfa mount was replaced by two RBU-6000s.
[ img ]

The other four A’s remained primarily ASW platforms and were comprehensively modernized in 1974/6 with the same sensor and ECM suite as their sisters; they also replaced the Alfas with RBU-6000s. They retained all four ASW torpedo tube sets and received a modern Thiarian-designed bow sonar; for improved self-defence, an Osa-M missile complex was installed aft. In 1979/80, they were further modernized with SATCOM and countermeasures launchers.
[ img ]

The A’s were replaced from the mid-1980s with much larger D-class multirole destroyers; seven were scrapped betwee 1987 and 1993, but Aduain was retained as a memorial at An Trionaid.

Greetings
GD


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Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: March 23rd, 2020, 3:51 pm
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Thiarian Cruisers and destroyers – modern era

B. 1950 - 1980

1. B-Class destroyers
In 1955, most restrictions on Thiaria’s military were lifted. Thiaria’s destroyer force at that time consisted of four T-class ships and a mix of older M-, N- and P-class units; eight A-class destroyers which had been begun during the war were in the process of being completed to a modest ASW design since 1952. By 1955, it was clear that all older units including the T’s would need replacement at short notice. Preliminary studies based upon a 1943 design for a 3.500-ton destroyer leader had already been undertaken from 1953, and the final design for the 1955 destroyer was already approved several weeks before the Americans gave green light to resume warship construction. Particulars were the following:

Displacement: 3.850 ts standard, 5.100 ts full load
LOA: 146,50 m
Beam: 15,20 m
Draught: 4,58 m mean (without sonar dome), 5,64m deep load
Machinery: Two-shaft TDA steam turbines, four Llanhaudh 1.000psi boilers, 80.000 SHP
Design Speed: 32,5 knots
Range: 5.000 nm @ 20 kts
Crew: 320

Although based upon a development of a WW2 design, the new type included many novel features: They were the first Thiarian destroyers with five-bladed screws and retractable fin stabilizers, and the first to follow the contemporary fashion of using aluminium for much of the superstructure. They were designed with ample volume reserves for additional electronics and had a very modern appearance due to their futuristic bridge structure and streamlined funnels. Most importantly, with the numerical size of Thiaria’s navy severely curtailed, these ships were to receive a revolutionary new type of main armament: SAMs. At that time, the only (more or less) operational SAM system available on the free market was the Swiss Oerlikon RSA; the Thiarians had acquired several launchers and missiles for testing purposes in 1953/4 and (at first secretly) developed a much more robust navalized launch and guidance system for these missiles. Primitive as they were – they were liquid-fueled and could not be kept at extended readiness, their beam-riding guidance only allowed the engagement of markedly subsonic targets at medium altitude, and they needed to be reloaded using trolleys and a crane, as the proposed 25-round vertical drum magazine was too large for any destroyer-sized ship – they nevertheless extended the air defence range of any ship carrying them to 12 nautical miles, quite beyond the range of any operational airborne antiship weapon of that age. Apart from the missile system, armament and sensor suite of the design made full use of the ship’s generous size and was complete and well balanced: They carried two Mk42 127mm gun mounts, two twin Mk33 76mm gun mounts, four triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes, two hedgehogs, one twin launcher for a total of 24 RSA missiles. The sensor suite was entirely US sourced, except the bow sonar, which was a brand-new domestic design.

Four ships were ordered in 1955; two were laid down early in 1956 (Abernenui Naval Yard and CTS), two early in 1957 (Nuatearman Naval Yard and CSCA). Following Thiarian naming conventions, they received adjectives beginning with a B as names, in order: Bithdhilis/S235 (Constant in Loyalty), Beomhar/S236 (Vivacious), Buach/S237 (Victorious) and Broduil/S238 (Proud). Construction was given maximum priority and proceeded swiftly; all four were completed in under three years. As usual, CSCA built fastest and delivered Buach after 29 months. Bithdhilis and Buach were commissioned together on September 1st, 1959, with Broduil following on June 20th, 1960 and Beomhar following on December 15th that year. The first two units of the class narrowly beat the US Coontz-class into service; this achievement made these Thiarian ships the first operational missile destroyers worldwide.
[ img ]

By the time these ships were complete, a substantially improved version of the RSA missile called RSC had become available, complete with an improved guidance system and launcher. Beomhar was already commissioned with this system and served as testbed; Bithdhilis was later retrofitted. The missile had longer range (20 nm), was faster (Mach 2,8) and a lot more maneuverable, but retained liquid fuel and beam riding guidance.
[ img ]

Although the advantages of the RSC missile over the RSA were substantial, the whole concept had little growth potential; by the early 1960s, potential enemies had supersonic jets on their aircraft carriers, against which missiles with beam-riding guidance were of little use. Consequently, Buach and Broduil were not refitted with the RSC. Fortunately for the Thiarians, the new Kennedy administration in the USA abandoned the previous government’s reluctance to to deliver high-end weaponry to Thiaria, and in 1963, the Thiarians placed an order for four Mk13 Tartar missile systems complete with launchers and SPS-26 3D radars. Unusually, modified SPG-55s were employed for guidance rather than the usual SPG-51s, in order to ensure commonality with the Terrier guidance systems installed in two Thiarian cruisers at that time. The planned Tartar refit would also have included removal of the by then rather useless hedgehogs and the installation of new US-sourced SQS-23 bow sonars.
[ img ]

These plans however came to naught. Thiaria descended into civil unrest in 1965 after CIA attempts to influence elections, and the 1966 repeat elections yielded a far-left government which openly leaned towards the east block. No Tartar ever reached Thiaria. The Thiarians decided to phase out the RSA anyway and convert Buach and Broduil to ASW destroyers. They purchased Malafon standoff ASW weapons and towed array sonars in France, which was still willing to supply weapons to Thiaria after its slide to the left. The whole aft superstructure was replaced with a helipad and a spacious hangar above the Malafon magazine. TACAN and a primitive Satcom antenna were installed, a Thiarian-designed B23E-1 air-/surface search radar replaced the SPS-10, and an additional B22L-1 navigation radar was fitted. The hull sonar was replaced by a bow-mounted Thiarian A20T-1 set. Two Alouette II helicopters (which could carry a single 400mm ASW torpedo each) were embarked as a stop-gap solution. Conversion of Buach was complete in 1969, Broduil followed in 1970.
[ img ]

After the 1970 elections consolidated the far left government, Thiarian military co-operation with the Soviets increased, and it was decided to first refit Bithdhilis and Beomhar to a similar standard, then further refitting all four with Soviet and additional domestic equipment. The 76mm guns and their directors were landed and replaced with two retractable twin launchers for Osa-M (SA-N-4) missiles including new directors and a Thiarian B31T-1 target indication radar forward; the navigation radar was moved to the roof of the bridge. Two modified AK-230 turrets with radar guidance, which were fitted with new Thiarian Hispano-Suiza HS.804 20mm/80 cannon instead of the soviet 23mm originals, were installed aft for close defence. Two RBU-6000 ASW rocket launchers were fitted forward where the hedgehogs used to be. The SPS-6 was replaced by the new, large and powerful Thiarian B28A-2 very long range air search radar, which impressed the Soviets very much, and Soviet high-powered jamming gear was installed. Bithdhilis’ and Beomhar’s conversions were completed in 1974, the other two followed in the year after. By that time, the first specimens of the new Thiarian Muiscit helicopter (armed with two 400mm torpedoes or depth charges or unguided rockets and fitted with FLIR and a dipping sonar) were available; the type was tested on Bithdhilis in 1974, and by 1976, all four embarked two of these helicopters each.
[ img ]

Thiaria’s far left government was weakened in the 1974 elections, and Thiaria’s refusal to join the oil embargo against the west in this year soured relations to the Soviets. Between 1974 and 1978, Thiaria had three governments, and by 1977, the Soviet alliance was de facto dead. Although no spare parts for Soviet systems were delivered after that year, the Thiarians built unlicensed copies of them and continued to use Soviet equipment. Further modernizations of the B-class were undertaken in 1980 through 1982. They landed half their 400mm torpedo tubes in favour of four Exocet missiles in firing canisters mounted amidships, firing straight athwartships. The air- and combined search radars were upgraded to make them more jam-proof, and a modern SATCOM was installed, as was a decoy launcher. The 127mm guns were relined to 130mm and supplied with new extra long-range ammunition. In this shape, Bithdhilis and Beomhar shadowed the British fleet during Britain’s war with Argentina after Patagonia’s unilateral declaration of full independence in 1982 and Argentina’s subsequent invasion. Beomhar was fitted with the prototype of a new integrated commo mast shortly before that operation.
[ img ]

By the mid-1980s, these ships were quite worn; their construction had been very rushed and they aged quickly. All received the new commo mast in 1984/5, but after that, no further modifications were undertaken. In the second half of the 1980s, several of these ships were used to trial new equipments to be installed in their own replacements of the new D-class, which became available from 1986. Broduil in 1988 embarked the new fully automatic 130mm/60 compact gun turret, the new B33G-1 domed multipurpose gun- and missile fire control radar system and the new B34A-1 very long range phased array 3D-radar.
[ img ]

The B-class was decommissioned from 1989 through 1993 after an average of 30 years in service and replaced by the second batch of the D-class; all four units were scrapped by 1998.

2. C-Class destroyers
In 1961, the Kennedy administration not only agreed to transfer two aircraft carriers to Thiaria, they also promised delivery of modern Terrier and Tartar SAM systems. A firm order for two of the former and six of the latter to modernize all four Thiarian cruisers and the four B-class destroyers was placed in 1963; in 1965, a repeat order for four additional Terrier systems was placed to arm four large destroyers intended to act as escorts for the newly acquired carriers. The B-class hull, though well designed and modern, was too small to accommodate Terrier and the associated electronics, so a linear upscale with the following particulars was designed:

Displacement: 5.800 ts standard, 7.000 ts full load
LOA: 154,80 m
Beam: 18,15 m
Draught: 4,89 m mean (without sonar dome), 6,10 m deep load
Machinery: Two-shaft TDA steam turbines, four Llanhaudh 1.000psi boilers, total power 90.000 SHP
Design Speed: 32 knots
Range:5.000 nm @ 20 kts
Crew: 450

Apart from Terrier (one twin Mk.19 Mod.4 launcher fed from a 40-round magazine) and its associated Mk.56 fire control system, the ships were armed with two Mk.42 127mm and two Mk.34 76mm gun mounts (both license produced in Thiaria) and four triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes. Surface search radar, air search radar and bow sonar were Thiarian-designed; the SPS-39 3D-radar was to be US sourced. Their machinery was the same steam plant as the B’s, with slightly uprated boilers. The first hull was laid down in 1963, followed by one each year till 1967. In the sequence of Thiarian destroyer names, they were named for adjectives with C: Ciallmhar/S239 (Sensible), Ceanndana/S240 (Headstrong), Calma/S241 (Courageous) and Cailiuil/S242 (Illustrious). They were built at the Naval Yards Abernenui and Nuatearman (first two) and the private yards CTS and CSCA (last two).
[ img ]

As construction proceeded, Thiaria’s 1966 left government antagonized the US, and delivery of US components was cancelled, leaving these big, expensive ships without main armament. The first two were completed to launch readiness, then laid up awaiting a decision how to utilize them. The other two were dismantled on stocks. The Agaidh Dearg government was not enthusiastic about spending money on the Navy; in 1968, they seriously considered disbanding it entirely and relying on coastal-based SSMs for naval defense. This was of course rubbish; given Thiaria’s size and coastline, several hundred missile launchers and ground radar installations would have been needed, and it was obvious that the Navy could do the job more economically. In 1970, an agreement was struck with the Soviets: They would deliver four long-range M-11 Shtorm SAM systems and grant Thiaria a production license for the Osa and Osa-M short-range missile complexes; in exchange, Thiaria was to allow the Soviets to construct a fortified base for ballistic missile submarines. Construction of Ciallmhar and Ceanndana resumed late in 1971, and the other two were laid down a second time in 1972, this time on the two Naval Yards. Machinery was changed to two-shaft COSAG, consisting of 2 TDA steam turbines and two Llanhaudh 1.000psi boilers, coupled to two M8E Gas turbines. Total power dropped to 81.000 shp, reducing top speed to 31 kts, but machinery weight decreased, allowing for larger bunkers, and with increased fuel efficiency, range was now 6.500 nm @ 20 kts. Each ship received a Shtorm system (B-187A launcher with forty missiles), two Osa-M systems for self defense (ZIF-122 launchers with twenty missiles each), two RBU-6000 ASW rocket launchers and four AK-20H 20mm CIWS mounts; of the original armament, two 127mm gun mounts and two triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes were retained. As the Soviets had no 3D-radar which could be mounted on a 6000 ton hull, the SPS-39 was provisionally substituted with a Thiarian-designed mechanical height finder of questionable performance. In addition, high powered Soviet ECM was installed. Ciallmhar was completed late in 1973, Ceanndana early in 1975. Unlike the original design, their stern doubled as a helipad, although they had no hangar and no service installations.
[ img ]

By that time, the other two had just been launched. Their equipment was delivered in 1974, but Soviet technical support started to trickle down after the right swing of Thiaria’s 1974 elections. Construction had to be suspended for two years in order to achieve systems integration without help; during this time, the Thiarians completed their first domestic 3D-radar, which was integrated into the design. Ceanndana was completed in 1979, Cailiuil in 1980 – thirteen years after she had been laid down the first time.
[ img ]

As modern as the design had been when it was drawn up in 1962, it was obsolescent when all four were complete. Still, they were powerful ships in a brutish way, and formed the spearhead of Thiaria’s navy during the 1980s. Three of them belonged to the fleet that shadowed the RN during the Patagonian war. Soon after, all four C’s received four MM38 Exocet launch canisters amidships, and during the mid- to late 1980s, their 127mm guns were relined to 130mm and provided with modern long-range ammunition.
[ img ]

By 1990, the M-11 Shtorm could only be kept operational with great effort; usually only one of the class was operational due to the main armament being inoperable. In addition, the Soviet supplied gas turbines of Ciallmhar and Ceanndana made trouble, and both had to be placed in reserve in 1990; they were struck and scrapped in 1993. The last two however had domestic machinery and were ten years newer structurally. To extend their service life, the Thiarians decided to replace their Shtorm SAMs with the domestically developed R11S-1 missile complex which had been under developement for the follow-on D-class since the late 1970s and was in service since 1986. Apart from its drastically better performance, it was lighter and had 20% more magazine capacity. They also received a new domestic electronically scanned Air/Surface search radar, a modern bow sonar and improved R7S-2 missiles (developed from Osa-M with dual radar/IR guidance from Crotale EDIR for improved accuracy and ECM resistance, stronger rocket motors for Mach 4.5 speed and more maneuverability, and much heavier warheads) for their Osa launchers. Calma was converted from 1990 to 1991, Cailiuil from 1992 to 1993. Both missed the gulf war due to this refit.
[ img ]

But both took part in the New Portugal war of independence in 1997, and Cailiuil also was present off Madagaskar during the international military intervention against the Lemurian-backed junta. They reached the limit of their service life in 2003 and 2004 and were retired on schedule. A proposed sale to Peru did not materialize, and they were scrapped in 2007.

Greetings
GD


Last edited by Garlicdesign on March 27th, 2020, 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: March 23rd, 2020, 4:00 pm
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Thiarian Cruisers and destroyers – modern era

C. 1980 - 2020

1. D-Class destroyers
During the oil boom years from 1973 through 1983, Thiaria quadrupled her naval budget. Two new large aircraft carriers were demanded in 1980, along with four large AAW destroyers to escort them, alongside the four C-class ships already available. While the carrier programme went through several modifications and did not really take off until 1985, the escort programme ran smoothly and on schedule. A design prioritizing range and seakeeping was drawn up in 1980. It betrayed some knowledge of the contemporary Soviet Udaloy-class, resembling it in size, underwater hull shape and dimensions (if marginally bigger), but differing in most detail solutions and specializing in another kind of mission. Particulars were:

Displacement: 7.050 ts standard, 8.600 ts full load
LOA: 164,75 m
Beam: 19,50 m
Draught: 6,15 m mean without sonar dome, 7,65 m deep load, 9,45 m maximum including sonar dome
Machinery: Two-shaft CODAG: Four CLTI RT2C-1 gas turbines (64.000 shp), coupled to four Nairn D34N-1D diesels (28.800 bhp), total power 92.800 shp
Design Speed: 30 knots
Range: 8.000 nm @ 20 kts
Crew: 400

Unlike the Udaloys, which had an all gas turbine powerplant, the Thiarian destroyers employed a rather complicated, but very efficient CODAG-plant. The gas turbines were the same as in the Treighdin-class carriers, but only half as many; on Diesels alone, 20 knots could be achieved. The different powerplant reflected in uptake arrangement, which was asymmetrical, as on contemporary US and Japanese ships, and occupied less space as on Udaloy. Design speed was somewhat reduced compared to previous types, matching the 30 knots of the carriers, but was exceeded both on trials and in service; designed range was unusually large at 8.000 nm. The very large, high-boarded hull was flush-decked; habitability was much better as on previous ships, as they needed less crew than their partly steam-powered and less automated predecessors. Seakeeping was excellent due to high freeboard and two pairs of retractable fin stabilizers. They were the first Thiarian destroyers with helicopter facilities built into the design; two spacious hangars arranged side by side opened to a large flight deck, under which a modern VDS and a towed torpedo decoy were stowed. Helicopter complement was two Kamov Ka-25, but considerably larger helos could be accommodated. Forward of the flight deck, two 20-round ZIF-122 launchers (copied without license) firing R7S-2 missiles were arranged side by side, providing close air defense; they were controlled by two integrated directors between them, in a staggered arrangement that covered the side and rear arcs; they had a blind area forward of about 120°. The aft funnel was offset to starboard, the forward one offset to port; the boats were stowed beside the funnels on the respective opposite sides. Between the funnels, two triple 400mm ASW torpedo tubes provided close range ASW muscle, and four MM38 Exocet launch canisters offered a secondary anti-surface capability. Gunnery comprised a single fully automatic Trenhaile LC47T-1 130mm L/60 gun forward, a very powerful piece offering a spectacular ROF of 40 rounds per minute. Appearances notwithstanding, it is not a single-barrel copy of the Soviet AK-130, but rather a linear upscale of the French 100mm Mle.1968 Compact, using domestically developed long-range ammunition allowing for a surface range of 48 kilometers. This is useful only for shore bombardments; effective range against surface targets is 24.000 meters, and 16.000 meters against air targets (elevation 85°maximum). The magazine holds 400 rounds. Close defence is provided by four Trenhaile LC38T-3 20mm guns (cyclic ROF 2.000 rounds/minute) in modified Soviet AK-230 turrets. Main armament of the class is a twin launch system for the SCI R11S-1 air defence missile, fed from a 48-round magazine developed from the Soviet B-187A launcher and operating on a similar principle. The missile is an all-domestic Thiarian development; it was originally based on the Soviet Buk (SA-6) system, but as completed bears little resemblance to it. It is two-staged and capable of a maximum range of 40 nm at Mach 4; ceiling is 20.000 meters. Guidance was originally semi-active radar with a backup IR sensor; track-via-missile guidance was introduced with the R11S-3 version of 1993, offering much improved ECM resistance and enabling the system to engage multiple targets simultaneously. The ship’s masts were arranged along the centerline. The aft mast carried the commo array, the ECM system (still a rather clumsy update of a Soviet Original), two of four CIWS directors, two SATCOM antennae and the electronically scanned 3D air surveillance and target acquisition radar. The lower foremast carried the other two CIWS directors, a SATNAV antenna, a long-range air search radar, a navigation radar and a surface search radar. The directors for the R11S missiles were staggered atop the bridge structure, with the 130mm gun director in a dome forward of them. Alongside the bridge, two RBU-6000 (again, unlicensed copies) ASW rocket launchers and a pair of countermeasures launchers were arranged.

1.1. Batch 1
At the time these ships were designed, they were the largest destroyers worldwide outside the USA, second only to the Kidd-class, which were longer, but less beamy. Although they cost over 450 million dollars apiece - not counting development cost of their brand-new guns and missiles – the Oireachtas approved an initial batch of four to be built simultaneously under the 1981 budget, at a time when Thiaria was swimming in money. A second batch (see below) was approved in 1986. Although there were proposals to give these vessels traditional cruiser names due to their sheer size, they eventually observed Thiarian destroyer naming conventions and became known as the D-class. Dolubtha/S242 (Inflexible) and Dathuil/S243 (Beautiful) were awarded to the CSCA yard in Abertemar, to be laid down in 1981 and 1982, respectively; Doscriostha/S244 (Indestructible) and Diail/S245 (Excellent) went to the SCI yard in Abernenui (an amalgamate of the former private CTS and the old Navy yard, privatized in 1978), to be built in the same timeframe. CSCA as usual built faster and delivered the class ship after four years in October 1985.
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The other three followed in July 1986 (Doscriostha), February 1987 (Dathuil) and April 1989 (Diail). The latter served as a trials vessel for the R11S-2 missile system with improved track-via-missile guidance, utilizing phased array directors of novel design. These allowed simultaneous tracking and illuminating of a dozen targets within the director’s 60°cone and allowed for engagement of targets the size and flight altitude of a Penguin or Sea Skua missile skimming the waves. Tests took a year and a half, delaying Diail’s commissioning as active-duty unit to November 1990. By that time, a new generation 400mm ASW torpedo was available too, and integrated into the ship’s combat system along the way.
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The other three all accompanied the carrier Oirion to the Persian Gulf in 1990 on their international debut; they did not engage any Iraqi aircraft because none dared attack the Thiarian battlegroup, but during exercises with French and US forces present, they validated their capabilities. The R11S-1 guidance system, the old-fashioned search radars and the still partly analogue combat system were considered something of a letdown; as soon as the task force returned from the Gulf, the decision to retrofit the whole class with the R11S-3 (series version of the R11S-2) missile and its phased array directors was made. At that time, a vastly improved version of the R7S missile system dubbed R7S-4 had become available too, utilizing the same kind of directors and featuring a new fin arrangement for drastically improved maneuverability, shorter reaction time, yet improved ECM resistance and somewhat longer range. R7S had always been capable of hitting sea-skimming missiles, but R7S-4 offered improved minimum engagement altitude and hit probability, considerably exceeding the performance of Sea Wolf or any Sea Sparrow version. They completed acceptance trials in 1993 and needed minimal modifications to their ZIF-122 launchers. To utilize these improved weapons to the full extent of their capabilities, a new generation of air- and surface search radars were required, replacing the 1960s vintage originals, and the bridge had to be rebuilt for the new fully digital integrated combat system. Reconstruction started in 1993 for Dolubtha and took a year and a half; by late 1996, all four had been modernized.
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The class took part in the New Portugal war of independence in 1997, where their R11S-4 and R7S-4 missiles impressively defeated some quite determined Brazilian attacks; between them, the D’s downed nine Brazilian aircraft and shot down over thirty missiles, half of them modern Sea Eagles. Doscriostha was also credited with severely damaging an old Brazilian destroyer with an Exocet, and her helicopter assisted in the sinking of a Brazilian Upholder-class submarine. Dathuil on the other hand was severely damaged by a Brazilian 250kg guided bomb, which was intercepted by one of her R7S-4 missiles, but not destroyed; it struck the destroyer forward of the gun mount, ripping off her bow and very nearly detonating her gun magazine, which had to be flooded. She was still under repair when Doscriostha and Dolubhtha took part in the Madagaskar intervention of 2000; the former downed three Lemurian aircraft, the latter one, and they participated in defeating a heavy attack involving over sixty old KSR-5 (AS-6) missiles fired by Lemurian Tu-16 and Tu-22M bombers. After that conflict, the class was again taken in hand for further upgrades. Most visibly, they landed their obsolescent 20mm CIWS and their RBU-6000 ASW rocket launchers; instead, they received three Spanish Meroka 12-barrelled 20mm CIWS which were procured under a counter-trade agreement some years earlier, after Spain had license-built six Thiarian frigates in the 1980s. They replaced their original ECM system with a new, domestically developed ECM suite, received a more powerful 3D radar with a larger antenna, a new countermeasures suite and a backup electro-optical targeting system for their guns. The R11S directors were upgraded with larger antennae covering an arc of 120° and overall enhanced capabilities; the missiles themselves received new boosters extending their range to 60 nm and their speed to Mach 4.5 (designated R11S-5). Their anti-surface punch was dramatically increased by replacing the old MM38 with twice their number of supersonic sea skimming ANS missiles, and finally, the decoy and countermeasures suite was refurbished to counter contemporary threats. Refit took two years each; Dolubhtha was the first to re-emerge in 2003, followed by Doscriostha in 2005, embarking brand-new EC225 Caracal helicopters, replacing the Ka-25s.
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The other two followed in 2006 and 2008, by which time all had EC225 helicopters. By that time, they were twenty years old and still in good shape, which was a good thing because no new destroyers were laid down for the Thiarian fleet between 1990 and 2003, when economic growth had slowed down and come to a temporary standstill around the turn of the century. With the new E-class entering service not before 2010 and two ancient C-class ships urgently needing replacement, the D’s needed to remain in the front line till 2015, when Dathuil – the lame duck of the class after the structural damage taken in 1997 – was retired at age 28. At that time, the other three had received a new electronically scanned air/surface search L-Band radar forward and had two Austrian-built Camcopter UAVs added to their air component. Since 2012, the class also mounted four 12,7mm HMG mounts with remote control capability for self-protection against asymmetric terrorist attacks.
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Dathuil has been scrapped by 2020. Dolubhtha is scheduled to retire in 2021, Doscriostha in 2023 and Diail in 2024; one of them will likely be retained as a stationary training ship assigned to the Naval Academy in Noyâlo.

1.2. Batch 2
As the D-class destroyers were the designated escorts for the Treighdin-class carriers, the upscale of the carrier programme from two to three ships did not fail to impact the destroyer programme too. As soon as funding for three carriers had been approved under the 1985 budget, a second batch of D-class destroyers was proposed to provide four AAW destroyers per carrier. At that time, Thiaria’s immediate environment was hostile as hardly ever before; Brazil was the traditional enemy, South Africa had been antagonized by Thiaria’s support for Angola during the Agaidh Dearg years, Chile by Thiaria’s neutrality during the Patagonian war, and Argentina was in internal turmoil after its disastrous defeat in that conflict. On the other hand, money was still abundant in 1985, and another four D’s were approved under the 1986 budget. The private yards had done a good job on the first batch, so CSCA was awarded Doshasta/S247 (Implacable) and Dothreaite/S248 (Impregnable) to be laid down in 1987 and 1989, respectively, and SCI laid down Danartha/S249 (Fierce) in 1988 and Dioghair/S250 (Vehement) in 1990. Construction of this class took place towards the end of Thiaria’s 1970s/80s economic boom; the first gulf war had resulted in a sharp drop in oil price, inflation was picking up, the carriers ate up a sack of money, and billions of state investments were needed to diversify Thiaria’s industry away from its dependency on oil. These factors combined to delay the second batch; they were laid down considerably behind schedule, and gestation times averaged seven years. On the plus side, some new technology could be built into them, resulting in a wholly changed armament. In 1992, SCI presented a workable VLS for the R11S missile complex; it could hold 64 rounds within the same space and at less weight than the magazine-fed twin launcher used on the first batch, apart from the obvious advantage in ROF. A VLS for the R7S missile had been developed for the Treighdin-class carriers, and two 24-cell units replaced the ZIF-122 launchers. Total number of SAMs thus increased from 88 to 112, and these ships carried the R7S-4 missile from the beginning. Both systems were equipped with phased array directors, which were re-arranged (one each for the R11S and two each for the R7S, fore and aft) to eliminate the blind areas which had plagued the first batch. Instead of MM38 SSMs, two quad launch canisters for MM40 Block 1 missiles were installed. The 130mm gun was retained, but the 20mm CIWS were replaced by three Trenhaile LC50T-2 57mm mounts (two abreast the bridge, one center aft between the hangars). These guns had a cyclic ROF of 240 rounds per minute; with four times the effective range of the old 20mm CIWS and excellent reaction time and accuracy, they were well suited for anti-missile defence. Doshasta was completed to this standard in May 1995.
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Danartha followed in February 1997, Dothreaite in October 1997 and Dioghair in July 1999. Doshasta was present during the New Portugal war of Independence 1997, shooting down three Brazilian airplanes and four missiles; Dothreaite and Dioghair took part in the Madagaskar intervention of 2000, claiming 11 Lemurian aircraft and over 20 missiles between them. These figures impressively confirmed their capabilities; the Lemurians had actually considered the Thiarian squadron the weak part of the UN fleet and singled it out for concentrated attack, with disastrous results. Despite convincing performance, they were thoroughly kept up-to-date. Between 2005 and 2008, they received ANS supersonic sea-skimming SSMs, R11S-4 SAMs with bigger boosters, EC225 helicopters, a new 3D radar with improved performance and much longer range, an all-new ECM and countermeasures suite, improved directors for their R11S missiles, IRST, and backup electro-optical targeting systems.
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The refit was hardly complete when a much more thorough reconstruction was approved in 2012 in order to extend the service life of these ships to the early 2030s. They received a completely new foremast with four planar antennae of a combined search/target acquisition/tracking/illumination AESA array, and a yet again modernized ECM suite; the aft mast was cut down and CIWS directors and commo antennae were re-arranged. The integrated combat system was upgraded with ten times the computing capacity as previously, and a new secure datalink dome was added. The new main radar made the R11S directors redundant; the R7S directors were however retained and modified to act as backup directors for the main missile complex if the main radar was disabled. Two Camcopter UAVs were embarked, and two remote-controlled 30mm automatic gun mounts (ROF 1.800 rpm) were added forward to deal with asymmetrical threats. These guns could also be coupled to the CIWS fire control system and add their firepower when the ship came under missile attack. The first unit to complete this refit was Danartha in 2016.
[ img ]

Doshasta and Dioghair followed in 2018 and 2020; Dothreaithe will follow in 2022. The last two differ from their sisters by receiving new gun mounts for their 57mm and 130mm guns, which are capable of operating without turret crews. Four 12.7mm MG mounts have also been added.
[ img ]

As of 2020, three are in active service and one is under refit. After their refit, they are cleared for a total service life of 35 years and will operate till 2030 at least.

2. E-Class
Throughout the cold war era, Thiarian destroyers were plagued by frequent changes of design and the necessity to install equipment that either was not up to date or became quickly inoperable when technical support dried up. Even the D-class, shipbuilding-wise a world-beating design, had featured a curious mix of indigenous, Soviet and French gear of inconsistent performance levels and needed frequent refits to keep up with foreign developments. But when the Soviet Union finally collapsed in 1996 and everyone started to cut defense spending, the Thiarian Navy sensed a chance to catch up with foreign development and launched development of a big stealthy missile destroyer in 1999. In 2000, the following particulars were set:

Displacement: 7.650 ts standard, 9.000 ts full load
LOA: 168,00 m
Beam: 20,40 m
Draught: 6,20 m mean without sonar dome, 7,80 m deep load, 9,15 m maximum including sonar dome
Machinery: Two-shaft CODLAG: Four CLTI RT2C-4 gas turbines (64.000 shp), coupled to two OSD E-175 diesel generators, powered by 4 Nairn D42N-1 diesels (32.000 bhp), total power 96.000 shp
Design Speed: 30 knots
Range: 8.000 nm @ 20 kts
Crew: 250

Externally, the ships are obviously based on the successful layout of the preceding D-class, which in turn had influenced the French Horizon-type; they are the second Thiarian surface warship class with a stealthy hull shape (after the 1995 vintage Caitriona-class frigates); RCS is 10% of a D-class ship. Machinery is diesel-electric up to 20 knots, with gas turbine boosters for higher speeds. Their engines are less powerful than comparable US, Japanese and South Korean AEGIS destroyers, but more fuel-efficient; 30 knots is easily attained and considered sufficient. The plant operates considerably quieter than the geared CODAG on the D-class, and noise levels have been generally reduced to a quarter. A prairie/masker equivalent is installed to further reduce acoustic signature. ASW equipment includes a VDS and a towed torpedo decoy, stored beneath the flight deck. There are no trainable torpedo tubes, but two fixed 324mm tubes on either side fed from two magazines, each holding up to 30 torpedoes or supercavitating anti-torpedo hardkill drones. Two EC225 Caracal helicopters can be stowed in the spacious hangar; unlike the D’s, there are no individual hangars for each helo, but a single one with the hangar door offset to port. Main armament is the CPAC integrated combat system, consisting of a Thiarian-designed four-panel AESA targeting and illuminating radar, a long-range 3D air surveillance radar, a datalink system for cross-feeding information between various ships, and the ASTER missile system, whose development Thiaria had joined in 1992. The missiles are stowed in a domestically designed VLS developed from the one used for the R11S; as these Thiarian destroyers are much larger than the European ASTER platforms, they pack twice the number of missiles: 64 forward and 32 aft right next to the hangar, for a maximum loadout of 96 ASTER 30 missiles, capable of Mach 4,5 and a range of 65 nm, with unsurpassed accuracy against targets of any size and speed, traveling at any altitude between sea level and 20 kilometers up. This was pretty much what a late R11S could do as well, but unlike the R11S, ASTER 30 is fully TBMD capable, and the CPAC combat system is designed to make full use of this capacity. The forward VLS tubes are deeper than the aft ones and can accommodate SCALP-Naval ground attack cruise missiles instead of ASTERs. Gunnery is the same as on the second batch of the D-class, but in stealthy mounts capable of operating unmanned at twice the reaction speed of the previous generation. The aft 57mm mount has been moved from the amidships position (as on the D-class) to starboard because of the asymmetrical hangar arrangement. A new type of phased-array director has been introduced (four units – one forward, one aft and two at both sides of the foremast) which is capable of controlling not only all gun systems embarked, but can also provide guidance for the ASTER 30 system if the main AESA radar is unavailable. Each director can handle 20 targets in an 90° arc. Two remote-controlled 30mm autocannon abreast the mainmast, which can be linked to the fire control system, and four remote-contollable 12.7mm MGs (two at the rear end of the hangar, two in the bridge wings) are available for defence against asymmetrical attacks. Unlike the D’s, anti-surface punch was not added to these ships as an afterthought; they mount no less than twelve ANS supersonic sea skimming missiles amidships from the start. They can deliver a 165kg shaped charge warhead over a range of 100 nm, traveling at Mach 2,5 at sea level.

After lengthy debate, the design was approved in 2002, and an initial batch of four ships was ordered under this year’s naval estimates. After the venerable CSCA yard, responsible for some of the most iconic Thiarian warships of the 20th century, had gone bankrupt in 2001 and been taken over by SCI, all four were contracted to that company, Thiaria’s last remaining builder of surface warships. Construction went ahead slowly in order to keep the shipyard continuously occupied in a time of poor business. Ealaionta/S251 (Artful) was laid down in 2003, Eascardiuil/S252 (Hostile) in 2005, Eachtach/S253 (Adventurous) in 2007 and Eirimiuil/S254 (Clever) in 2009. When Thiaria’s economy picked up momentum after 2003, a second batch was approved in 2008. The economic crisis starting that year affected Thiaria less than most other western nations, because Thiaria was only moderately indebted at that time and had not run up a real-estate bubble either, and the programme, though postponed for five years, survived intact. Eagnai/S255 (Wise) was laid down in 2013, Eolgaiseach/S256 (Skillful) in 2015, Eifeachtuil/S257 (Effective) in 2017, and Easca/S258 (Quick) in 2019. Ealaionta was completed more or less on schedule in 2009.
[ img ]

She was fitted for, but not with four additional 16-cell lightweight VLS, to be mounted forward abreast of the main ASTER launcher. This VLS could hold either VL Mica close defence SAMs (Range 12 nm, capable of engaging supersonic sea-skimmers like Oniks/BrahMos) or wire-guided Polyphem lightweight antisurface missiles for dealing with threats up to 32 nm out and not worthy of spending an ANS on them; they also had loitering capability and could double as short-range surveillance drones. This system became available in 2016; none of the first batch was completed with it; Eascardiuil completed 2011, Eachtach 2014 and Eirimiuil 2016. The first E-class ship mounting it was Eagnai, which completed late in 2019; she toted no less than 172 ready-to-launch missiles. She also was the first one to embark two Znamenany L4Z-1 UAVs. Their prime role was surveillance, but they could carry two Trigat ATGMs each, of which the ship embarked a dozen. Her ANS missiles are Block 2, available since 2017, with ECM, active stealth and swarming capabilities similar to NSM.
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The last three are scheduled to be completed in 2022, 2023 and 2025, respectively. They will remain Thiaria’s primary surface combatant till the 2050s. Future upgrades will include Aster 30 Block 2 with the capability to intercept ballistic missiles before atmospheric re-entry at altitudes of up to 80.000 meters; range against normal air targets will exceed a hundred nautical miles. They are expected in service by 2025. Also in the pipeline is ANS Block 3, effectively a completely new missile, passively stealthy and capable of Mach 4 over a distance of 120 nm, to be deployed from 2028.

Greetings
GD


Last edited by Garlicdesign on April 12th, 2020, 6:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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StealthJester
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: March 23rd, 2020, 4:11 pm
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Location: Spokane Valley, Washington, US
Amazing work as always!


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Shigure
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: March 23rd, 2020, 4:16 pm
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AMAZING.

I just love the C and D classes.

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[ img ] Next on my work list : a cruiser


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