[Post Reply] [*]  Page 33 of 35  [ 344 posts ]  Go to page « 131 32 33 34 35 »
Author Message
Hood
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: August 28th, 2018, 11:37 am
Offline
Posts: 6275
Joined: July 31st, 2010, 10:07 am
I'd like to add something more meaningful than awesome or wow but I'm really struggling to say anything other than wow these are awesome!
I don't think we've ever seen such a breadth of AU landing ships before on SB.

_________________
Hood's Worklist
English Electric Canberra FD
Interwar RN Capital Ships
Super-Darings
Never-Were British Aircraft


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
IrishAFNG
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: August 28th, 2018, 9:14 pm
Offline
Posts: 6
Joined: December 22nd, 2014, 5:52 pm
Minor correction on your gaelige. It's probably a typo anyway.

Miall Noigiallach should be Niall Noigiallach, assuming you're referring to Niall of the Nine Hostages, of course.


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Calis
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: August 29th, 2018, 2:59 pm
Offline
Posts: 176
Joined: March 29th, 2013, 6:10 pm
This is one of my favorite AU's, these ships are truly amazing.


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
reytuerto
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: August 29th, 2018, 8:53 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 1158
Joined: February 21st, 2015, 12:03 am
Excellent drawings! I enjoy a lot with your attack transports! (and with the names, poetic Celtic like names).


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
eswube
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: August 31st, 2018, 7:56 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 9080
Joined: June 15th, 2011, 8:31 am
Contact: Website
Another truly awesome set of drawings.

_________________
My very neglected Deviantart page


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: December 20th, 2018, 8:06 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 925
Joined: December 26th, 2012, 9:36 am
Location: Germany
Hello again

Thiarian Auxiliaries – Part 1
This summary includes all ship-sized auxiliaries of the Thiarian Navy and Coast Guard. Not included are hundreds of auxiliary boats operated by both services (traffic boats, lighters, barges, harbour tugs, buoy and lighthouse tenders, harbour patrol craft, floating dredgers, small sail training ships, picket boats, torpedo catchers and the like); these were often locally purchased or refitted from civilian vessels from a multitude of sources. Their variants go into the hundreds and quite exceed both the scope of this thread and my patience to draw them all.

1. Training ships
Like most navies in that era, the Thiarians did not have any purpose-built training vessels in 1918, relying on retired warships for training duties. In Thiaria’s case, some very old specimens remained in service for a long time, because many of the newest vessels had to be ceded to the victors of the Great War. By the mid-1920s however, funds for two ‘Cadet Training Sloops’ which were in fact small cruisers, were made available. Besides the specialized training ships described below, many other warships were at some point employed for training; this use is specified under the appropriate sections.

1.1. LT Neamhspleachas
The premier gunnery training ship of the Thiarian fleet in the 1930s and 1940s was the retired pre-dreadnought battleship LT Neamhspleachas (Independence) of 1908 and 1916-18 war fame. After retiring from active service in the mid-1920s, she was refitted for training service in 1928-29. She landed her main belt, replacing it with a thinner 165mm strake, and the 165mm gun turrets. The fore and aft ones were replaced with new 140/55 twins, the center ones with two twin 100mm AA guns on either side. Eight 37mm/50 guns in four open twin mounts made up the close range AA armanent. All fire control systems currently in use with the Thiarian fleet were installed. The aft funnel was removed and new boilers for 12.000 hp were installed; the totally refurbished engines now were good for 15 knots.
[ img ]

In 1936, the cranes were replaced with larger ones and facilities to operate two floatplanes were embarked. Space restrictions however ruled out the installation of catapults.
[ img ]

During the war, radar and sixteen 20mm guns were added; LT Neamhspleachas continued to train gunners, spotters and radar operators throughout the war.
[ img ]

In 1945, Neamhspleachas was decommissioned, disarmed and hulked, but her hull was still sound, and she served as ammunition and explosives depot. For this role, she was moored outside the naval base at Nuatearman; all ships that went to dock there in the postwar years came alongside of Neamhspleachas first and disembarked their ammunition.
[ img ]

She fell into disuse during the mid-1960s and slowly rotted away, but her hull held, and she petulantly remained afloat. In 1980 a private club was formed with the purpose of purchasing her, restoring her to her 1908 condition and turning her into a museum. The Navy realized the value such a monument would have for the service’s image and recruitment effort and donated the hull for free. An early form of crowdfunding provided much of the money required for her restoration, and the government lavishly subsidized the project. Between 1982 and 1988, the hull was carefully refurbished to her 1908 state, and every system was replicated to original plans. LT Neamhspleachas was opened as a museum in 1990 in Carriolar and has since become one of the main attractions of the Thiarian capital; in 2007, she had her lower hull painted in the Navy’s new dark blue protective colour to combat corrosion.
[ img ]

She remains there to this day and can be visited for Chros 22,-- per adult (60,-- per family of 4). Together with the Japanese Mikasa and the Greek Georgios Averof, she is one of only three surviving pre-dreadnought age capital ships worldwide.

1.2. LT Muirbhreid
Officially classed as an engineering training ship, the former armoured cruiser LT Muirbhreid (Dreadnought) was employed as a cruiser till 1931 with very few modifications; then she was taken in hand and virtually gutted in 1931-3. The refit saw her reboilered with boilers of four different types. Only the center shaft retained her old VTE engines, while the wing shafts received turbines, again of two different types. Design speed remained 22 knots. Of her original armament, only the four 195/45 guns remained; she however received six single 130mm destroyer guns, four 75mm DP guns and fourt 37mm AA guns with the associated fire control systems and could act as a TV for destroyer gun crews as well. Remarkably, her superstructure was little changed.
[ img ]

In this shape, she served till 1945 with very few modifications; 1943 saw the installation of radar and eight 20mm guns.
[ img ]

Muirbhreid was abandoned during the civil war in a small port on Thiaria’s east coast; she remained there for three years, ignored and rotting, and became leaky. In 1948, she capsized during a storm. She was broken up where she lay, bit for little bit, till 1954.

1.3. Naomh-Siobhan-Class
By the mid-1920s, Thiaria’s cruiser force was a motley collection of obsolete vessels which had seen hard war use. Two protected cruisers of 1902 vintage were used as cadet training ships, but they were in poor shape and had notoriously uncomfortable habitability. Replacing them with purpose-built cadet training ships was not considered using up any of the tight cruiser tonnage allotted to Thiaria by the Treaty of Norfolk, so CSCA was ordered to design hulls which were not cruisers, but could be turned into such at short notice. Like the later Japanese Katori-class, which they certainly inspired (and physically resembled, being the first Thiarian warships since the early 1910s without a forward tripod mast), they were fitted with a COSAD type propulsion; the diesels were installed in a way that allowed rapid replacement if more advanced ones became available, an option that was exercised several times during the life of these ships. 250 cadets could be embarked. Both were unarmoured except for splinter protection to the main gun turrets. Officially, they were rated at 3.000 ts and 18 kts speed, with four 140mm LA guns, four 100mm AA guns, four 37mm AA guns and six 559mm torpedo tubes. In fact, they displaced 4.200 tons and were capable of 24 knots; they had the specified armament, but were fitted for another two 140mm guns and a catapult, which were to be installed as soon as the political climate allowed.
[ img ]

They were laid down in 1926 and 1927 at the CSCA yard and both commissioned in 1929. They were named for Thiaria’s national saints, Naomh Siobhan (St.Joan of Ark) and Naomh Padraig (St.Patrick). Between 1930 and 1933, Naomh Siobhan was painted in a pre-1908 black-green-buff livery to commemorate the Centennial of Thiaria’s formal independence from France in 1930.
[ img ]

After a decade of valuable service which produced many of the brilliant junior officers which fought with distinction against often overwhelming odds in the Second World War, both still mounted their original armament in 1940 because upgunning them would have required to curtail the construction of ‘real’ cruisers. They however did receive the planned aviation equipment, HF/DF, depth-charges (in racks aft and for one K-gun on each side), hydrophones and ASDIC for ASW training; they were also fitted with four quad 13mm AAMGs.
[ img ]

In the initial phase of the war, both were pressed in active service after the fleet had taken heavy losses; they were used as convoy escort flagships. During a desperate sortie of Patagonian destroyers shortly before Patagonia’s collapse in 1941, Naomh Padraig was thrice torpedoed and lost with heavy casualties. Naomh Siobhan had been damaged by Patagonian cruiser and destroyer gunfire in the same week, but survived; during repairs, she was fitted with radar and comprehensively rearmed, although to a different pattern than originally planned: Her whole main armament was landed, and eight 130mm DP guns were fitted. Eight single fully automatic 37mm/70 guns and six twin 20mm cannon made up the light AA fit. The torpedo tubes, ASW gear and the aircraft were retained, turning her into a fully capable escort cruiser. Nevertheless, the military situation was sufficiently stabilized when she re-emerged in February 1942 that she reverted to training duty.
[ img ]

The last wartime cadet class graduated late in 1943; afterwards, Naomh Siobhan was again sent to the front as a convoy escort. She was lost in action in May 1944 during a British airstrike after shooting down 11 enemy planes.

2. Netlayers and Net Tenders

2.1. Bauaine-Class
When the Thiarians started to build up their shipbuilding capacity in the mid-1920s, they also ordered four specialized netlayers to quickly fortify ports or temporary bases. They used the same hulls as the Spiorad-Naomh-class survey ships and the Tir-Parthas-class minelayers and were named for Bays: Bauaine, Ba Galbruith, Ceas Croi and Urlar Adhmaid. All were built by CTS. Their armament consisted of a single 75mm gun aft and four 8mm AAMGs, and they were diesel-powered for a speed of 16 knots.
[ img ]

During the war, they received a single 37/70 forward (1942/3) and four twin 20mm autocannon (1941/2). The last four were already completed to this standard.
[ img ]
Bauaine was lost on an air-dropped mine in Montevideo 1943 and Ba Galbruith by a Brazilian airstrike at the same place, only a few months later. The other two were sold to private buyers in 1948.

2.2. Bagorm-Class
These small net tenders were built under the 1936, 1938 and 1940 programmes (4 each) by small private yards (CDO, Meara, Loingshigh&Rian and Payeur). They had twin-screw trawler hulls for maximum maneuverability and were unarmed except for four 13mm AAMGs. Like the larger Netlayers, they were named for Bays: Bagorm, Ba na Saifire, Ba na Bleith, Ba Lonrach, Ba na Radharc, Baghainimh, Bafuar, Baceilte, Ba na Mhuice, Ba Dhraiochta, Bamiofar and Baciuin. Although they could lay nets if required, their purpose was mainly servicing existing boom and net defences around major bases.
[ img ]

Ba na Bleith, Bafuar and Ba Dhraiochta were lost in action, and Bagorm and Ba na Saifire were scuttled in Montevideo in 1944. The remainder was kept in service in supporting roles and not phased out before the mid-/late 1960s.

3. Aviation support ships

3.1. Maighdean-Class
In the early 1930s, the Thiarian naval ministry tried to economize auxiliary production by ordering several hull designs which were carefully crafted to fill several different requirements. The largest of these, dubbed the ‘Large Standard Hull’ yielded not only the Priomhaire-class amphibious assault ships, but also the Maighdean-class aviation support ships. These vessels displaced nearly 15.000 tons and were good for 24 knots. They had four catapults and two obliquely arranged cranes aft. There were two hangars on two deck levels: One aft in the hull, and one in the main superstructure. They could serve all types of Thiarian floatplanes up to and including large twin-engined patrol flying boats; their normal complement of twelve scout fighters and 24 recon floatplanes was frequently varied. Armament consisted of eight 100mm AA guns in four twin mounts (two superfiring forward, two abreast the superstructure) and twelve semi-automatic 37mm cannon (three twin mounts abreast forward and aft); although these ships could have accommodated the quad automatic 37/70, these guns were reserved for ‘true’ warships and not installed. Their task was to provide recon cover, spotting and some basic air defense and ASW screening to the battlefleet without counting against Thiaria’s tonnage allowance of true aircraft carriers. They also carried extensive repair facilities for airplanes and a huge aviation fuel supply, enabling them to act as service units for carrier battlegroups as well. Two hulls were built by CSCA: LT Maighdean (the constellation Virgin) was laid down in 1936 and completed in 1939 and LT Saighdeoir (Sagittarius) was laid down in 1937 and also completed late in 1939.
[ img ]

Both were assigned Thiaria’s main battlefleet of four battleships in 1940; Saighdeoir was very severely damaged in February 1940 by British carrier planes and nearly sank. She was taken in hand for reconstruction to an escort carrier and re-emerged as such late in 1942; her general design provided the basis for the successful Feinics-class light fleet aircraft carriers. Maighdean was slated for a similar refit, but she was needed to provide recon and spotting for the battlefleet throughout 1941 and 1942 and could not be spared before mid-1943. Before any work could be done, she was however sunk by an aerial torpedo by a British Albacore and gunfire from the heavy cruisers HMS Lancaster and Fife. By that time, she had received twenty-eight 20mm cannon and a complete – if rather clumsily arranged – radar suite.
[ img ]

3.2. Gealain-Class
These four small seaplane tenders were half-sisters of the Uibhreasail-class minelayers; like these, they considerably exceeded their design speed of 20 knots (24 with dirty hulls was usually attained). They had half the armament of the minelayers (a twin 100mm AA mount and three twin 37mm cannon) and could accommodate four floatplanes (later three larger ones). Their designed task was establishing floatplane bases on suitable islands; unlike their larger sisters they were not meant to accompany fleets. Like all Thiarian aviation ships, they received names more or less closely associated with the realm of Astronomy: Gealain (Aurora), Realtra (Galaxy), Dreige (Meteor) and Tuarceatha (Rainbow). Two each were laid down in 1934 and 1935 by the CTS yard and completed in 1936 and 1937, respectively.
[ img ]

Their intended role was already obsolete when the war started; all four were pressed into convoy escort service from day one of the war, providing some basic air cover in the absence of escort carriers. Gealain and Dreige were early war losses, sank by Patagonian aircraft and a Patagonian submarine, respectively, before 1940 was half over. The other two soldiered on in the convoy escort role, but were not considered important enough for modernization. When the first Thiarian escort carriers became available late in 1942, both vessels were used as training ships for floatplane pilots and ASW personnel. In this role, both survived the war. Realtra was scrapped and cannibalized in 1953, but Tuarceartha remained in service as an electronics trials vessel till 1976 and was finally scrapped in 1979.

4. Oilers

4.1. Fast fleet replenishment ships

4.1.1. Solathrai-class
In the 1930s, Germany pioneered the new type of fast fleet replenishment ship with the Dithmarschen-class. In order to quickly gain experience with the new type, the Thiarians ordered two very similar units at the AG Weser yard in 1936. They were named Solathrai (Provider) and Tarrthalai (Rescuer) and delivered to Thiaria early in 1939. They were unusually fast at 23 knots and very ruggedly built; armament was four twin 100mm AA and two twin 37mm/50 AA. They not only carried fuel (about half as much as a proper tanker of their size) but also ammunition, refrigerated food, freshwater and other stores, and they were fitted for underway replenishment. Two additional units of the class were license-built by Thiaria’s CDO yard in 1938 and delivered in 1940, named Taobhai (Supporter) and Cosantoir (Protector).
[ img ]

These vessels were assigned to Thiaria’s main carrier strike force, resulting in Tarrthalai’s early loss to a British airstrike in March 1940. Two of the others took part in the Panama raid of 1942; at that time, Taobhai was already in yard hands for conversion to the escort carrier Coimead, from which she emerged early in 1943. The other two received a complete radar suite, eight single 37/70 autocannon and four twin 20mm AA in 1943/4.
[ img ]

They remained active with the carrier strike force, but Cosantoir was lost to a Recherchean submarine torpedo early in 1944. Solathrai was ceded to Brazil after the war and remained in service there till the mid-1970s.

4.1.2. Coimeadai-class
While the first two Solathrais were building, the Riordan yard, Thiaria’s leading builder of commercial vessels, evaluated the design and decided they could do better. They designed a 23.000-ton hull which was longer and wider than the Dithmarschen; it was more seaworthy due to higher freeboard and could travel at 22 knots, and it was of simpler construction and could be built more quickly. The first two were laid down in 1938, although one of them was converted to amphibious assault ship on stocks. A replacement was laid down in 1939, and two repeat hulls each in 1940, 1941 and 1942. In the aforementioned sequence, they were named Coimeadai (Watcher), Riarthoir (Administrator), Curadh (Champion), Caomhnoir (Safeguard), Maor (Steward), Coimirceoir (Guardian), Comhaireloir (Councellor) and Gobharnoir (Governor). The ships had very warship-like lines and bore no resemblance to the Solathrais externally. Armament was eight 100mm and twelve 37mm, plus six quad 13mm AAMGs. Coimeadai was completed in 1940, Riarthoir in 1941, Caomhnoir in 1942, Curadh in 1943, and Coimirceoir in 1944. Maor, Comhairleoir and Gobharnoir were converted to escort carriers on stocks and renamed; one each was completed in 1943 and 1944 (named Ghrianghaoth and Chaor Deisceart), and Eiclips (the former Gobharnoir) was still incomplete when the war was over. The first two units which were completed as AEs already had HF/DF upon completion, but no further electronics.
[ img ]

Coimeadai, Riarthoir and Caomhnoir took part in the Panama Raid in 1942; wherever a Thiarian fast fleet carrier or fast battleship went during the war, there usually was one Solathrai- or Coimeadai-class ship attached. Caomhnoir was lost in a Free French air strike during the battle of Meanchiorcal in 1943 and Curadh was sabotaged and blown up by British commandoes in Montevideo in July 1944. By that time, all extant units had swapped their 37/50 with new 37/70 autocannon in two quad turrets, added twelve twin 20mm cannon and received a high-end radar suite of the newest make, which amply reflects the importance of these ships for the Thiarian navy.
[ img ]

The three survivors were all ceded to the USA (1) and Great Britain (2, one of which went to Recherche). They were evaluated against the two surviving German Dithmarschens and found about equal; they were better sea boats, but slower and carried not significantly more stores despite their larger size. The Recherchean ship (Coimeadai) was transferred to the RIN in 1950, where it served till 1968; the other two were scrapped in the mid-1950s.

4.2. Transport oilers

4.2.1. Clian-Class
Three survivors of the Great War vintage Clian-Class – Clian, Gailim and Abha Mor, all named for rivers – remained active with the Thiarian navy in 1940. They were officially rated as replenishment oilers, but had no underway replenishment capability and carried no dry stores. As completed in 1918, their armament consisted of four 100mm LA guns and no AA at all.
[ img ]

All three were assigned to the main battlefleet in 1940 despite being only good for 16 knots. Gailim was sunk by a Patagonian submarine early in 1941. The other two were rearmed with two single 100mm DP guns and eight 20mm AA cannon in 1941/2; neither of these old ships was considered important enough to be fitted with radar.
[ img ]

They served as supply tankers for the expeditionary forces in South America from 1942. Both were sunk on the same day in May 1944 by British carrier airplanes.

4.2.2. Eithne-Class
In the late 1920s, the Thiarians discarded their last fleet colliers, as most old coal-burners had either been scrapped or converted to oil by that time. Five new replenishment oilers were ordered in 1927 from Riordan steel and were laid down in 1928 (1), 1929 (2) and 1930 (2); a sixth unit (laid down in 1928) was sold to Argentina in 1929. As usual for Thiarian oilers, they were named for rivers: Eithne, Eoghancha, Mhaigh, Mulcai and Feabhal. They were built at a leisurely pace and delivered between 1930 (Eithne) and 1933 (Mulcai). Armament was two twin 100mm/45 AA and four twin 37/50 AA. They could make 20 and sustain 16 knots with a single-shaft turbine plant, enabling them to travel with the main battlefleet, to which they were assigned; they could transfer oil underway, but carried no dry stores.
[ img ]

Mhaigh and Feabhal were early war losses; neither survived the initial onslaught of the Royal Navy before it had to retreat to deal with the Norwegian campaign. The other three remained with the Thiarian battlefleet throughout the war. By 1943, they had received radar and eight twin 20mm cannon.
[ img ]

Eoghancha was torpedoed by a Brazilian submarine in 1944. The other two were quite worn out after the war and were scrapped in 1949/50.

4.2.3. Nenui-Class
One of the first projects of the war emergency building programme was the adoption of a simple, robust and quickly built standard tanker hull. Riordan steel adapted a civilian pre-war design to military requirements, adding replenishment-at-sea facilities and an armament of six single 100/45 AA guns, four twin 37/50 AA guns and six twin 20mm autocannon. The ships had single-shaft diesel plants for a top speed of 16 knots, 15 knots being sustainable. Two pre-war hulls were confiscated in 1940 and refitted till 1941; in that year, four new hulls were laid down. Five more followed in 1942 and 1943 each, and eight in 1944. None of the 1944 ships were completed, but all of the others; building time averaged eight months. Like all large Thiarian tankers, they were named for rivers: Nenui, Liathui, Siorrad, Fuarsruth, Sirannui, Morbhui, Foire, Mearui, Goai, Meartabar, Ruathar, Deifir, Meirgruid, Teabhainn, Fuarai and Cliud. The 1944 hulls had not yet been assigned names. All were built by Riordan; Nenui and Liathui were originally laid down in 1938 and completed in 1939 for civilian owners.[ img ]

The 1942 and 1943 units (from Sirannui) were equipped with six single 37mm/70 autocannon instead the old 37mm/50s and had submarine type radar sets. None of the older vessels was refitted to this standard.
[ img ]

War losses were considerable. Fuarsruth, Mearui and Deifir were sunk by enemy aircraft, Liathui, Morbhui, Ruathar and Meartabar by submarines. After the war, Nenui, Siorrad, Meirgruid, Foire and Goai were demilitarized and sold to civilian buyers; they had long active lives afterward, and Goai as the last one was scrapped in 2002 in Angola.
[ img ]

Sirannui, Teabhainn, Fuarai and Cliud remained with the Thiarian navy and were refitted to fleet replenishment ships in 1955/58. Armament was changed to eight individually radar-controlled 37/70 autocannon, fuel capacity was reduced in favour of dry stores and refrigerated cargo, new cranes and improved underway replenishment gear was installed and the radar suite was brought up to date. They were re-engined and could now make 20 knots; their hulls were also strengthened.
[ img ]

They remained Thiaria’s prime replenishment vessels unitil the 1970s; they were retired and scrapped between 1977 and 1982.

4.2.4. Captured ships
During the initial phase of the war, Thiarian raiders captured a total of ten enemy oilers intact in the South Atlantic and sent them back to Thiaria. Seven of them were taken over by the Ministry of Transport (re-named for rivers if they were British, otherwise retaining their original names) and staffed with Naval Militia crews for use as supply ships; the other three were deemed too decrepit and scrapped. A typical example for a prize oiler is the former Dutch MV Surena, captured in June 1940 and re-commissioned in December after having been fitted with four old 65mm AA guns and twelve 13mm AAMGs for self-defence. Such ships received neither radar nor any kind of fire control.
[ img ]

All three survivors – Surena among them – were returned to their previous owners in 1945.

4.3. Petrol and water carriers

4.3.1. Loch-Chopair-Class
By 1939, four water carriers were available, which were named for lakes: Loch Chopair, Loch Leinn, Loch Uragh and Loch Choille. They were built in 1924 through 1926 and armed with two 75mm DP guns. Eight 20mm cannon were added during the war.
[ img ]

None of them ever ventured far off the coast of the Thiarian home islands. All four emerged undamaged after the war and continued to serve as water carriers till the early 1960s. The last one was scrapped in 1967.

4.3.2. Loch-Eadhna-Class
Another product of the war emergency building programme was a class of compact tankers designed to carry petrol for airplanes and tanks to Thiarian ground and air forces fighting abroad; they also could be used to carry freshwater. They had twin-shaft diesel engines for 18 knots speed and good maneuverability and carried two 100mm/45 DP guns, six 37mm/70 AA autocannon and eight 20mm autocannon to look after themselves in the face of enemy air attack. They were also considered important enough to be fitted with a complete radar suite. Three were laid down in 1941, four in 1942, five in 1943 and six in 1944. All but the 1944 units were completed by mid-1944; interestingly, they took longer to build than the larger Nenui-class oilers (average ten months), mostly due to the employment of small yards with limited workforce (CDO (4), Loingshigh&Riain (5) and Meara (3)). They were named for lakes (completed units only): Loch Eadhna, Loch Dairbhreach, Loch Chrathai, Loch Uachtair, Loch Luioch, Loch Chlochain, Loch Iascai, Loch Fioch, Loch Coiteain, Loch Gamhna, Loch na hUamha and Loch Dulocha.
[ img ]

Loch Dairbhreach, Loch Uachtair, Loch Fioch, Loch Gamhna and Loch Dulocha were lost to various reasons. Loch Luioch, Loch Iascai and Loch na hUamha were sold to civilian buyers after the war. Loch Eadhna, Loch Chrathai, Loch Chlochain and Loch Coiteain were retained by the Thiarian navy after the war and served until well into the 1970s. They were all scrapped by 1982.

4.3.3. Loch Liadh-Class
The wartime building programme included 36 ‘self-propelled liquid stores barges’ for harbour service to complement the ragtag fleet of 20 pre-war ships of this type (most of them of the riverine type). They were also named for lakes: Loch Liadh, Loch Bharmui, Loch Easaird, Loch Arbhach, Loch Toraic, Loch Chuirc, Loch Ban, Loch Claon, Loch Bhealtra, Loch Buinne, Loch Ceathruin, Loch Oileain, Loch Conbhui, Loch Sailean, Loch Dhoire, Loch Rois, Loch Dhrom Mor, Loch Droim, Loch Meilbhe, Loch Leith, Loch Luiche, Loch Eigis, Loch Ainnin, Loch Foirneise, Loch Ardguth, Loch Gleann Eada, Loch Inagh, Loch Charraigin, Loch Ghlais, Loch Cinneille, Loch Tochair, Loch Marbh, Loch Torc, Loch Fuaiche, Loch Riach and Loch Ghleannbhatha. The first six were laid down in 1942, then twelve in 1943 and 18 in 1944; the last six were never completed, and the six before them only after the armistice.
[ img ]

Seven were lost (two to mines, one to a submarine, one to an airstrike, three to accidents) and one was abandoned on the Parana in 1944. All survivors were sold to civilian owners after the war, and some still soldier on along the African coast.

To continue with Part 2

Greetings
GD


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: December 20th, 2018, 9:07 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 925
Joined: December 26th, 2012, 9:36 am
Location: Germany
Thiarian Auxiliaries – Part 2

5. Repair ships

5.1. Submarine tenders
In 1938 and 1939, two medium standard hulls each were laid down by the CTS yard to provide oceangoing submarine tenders. They were externally very similar to the Bladhmiaire-class Vehicle landing ships, of which they were half-sisters; they differed in having heavy-duty cranes instead LCVP davits, large cargo doors in the rear hull and a slightly different aft superstructure. Armament was roughly the same with eight 100mm/45 AA guns in four twin mounts (two abreast fore and aft) and no less than eight twin 37/50 semi-automatic AA guns. Four quad 13mm AAMG mounts were added for close work. Machinery and performance were identical to the Bladhmiaire-class. Like most Thiarian support craft, they were named for Saints: Naomh Conlaed, Naomh Riagail, Naomh Luchtigern and Naomh Mael Ruain.
[ img ]

They were completed in 1940 (Conlaed) and 1941 (other three) and served as mobile submarine bases throughout the war; one of them was always available at Montevideo, and another one at Valparaiso, till the Chilean coup of 1943 effectively terminated the Thiarian alliance. Mael Ruain was mined in the Rio de la Plata estuary in 1942 and lost; the other three were fitted with Radar and a total of 22 20mm guns in eleven twin mounts by the end of 1943.
[ img ]

All three survived the war, but had to be ceded to the Allies in 1947 in order to eliminate Thiaria’s ability to stage submarine operations from outside the home islands. They were used up in trials or scrapped till 1958.

5.2. Small craft tenders

5.2.1. Naomh-Ronan-Class
Four WWI-vintage Ursan-class escort gunboats were converted to minesweeper tenders in 1924 through 1927. They were renamed Naomh Ronan, Naomh Gobain, Naomh Cellach and Naomh Fintan, establishing the tradition of Thiarian auxiliaries to be named for saints. Their armament was cut to two 75mm DP guns, and they retained their VTE machinery for a speed of 18 knots.
[ img ]

Although they were upgunned with a single 37/70 autocannon and eight 20mm ones, they never received a complete radar suite. Only a small submarine-type search set and HF/DF was mounted; fire control remained optical only.
[ img ]

Cellach blew up for unknown reasons in 1941, Fintan had to be scuttled in Valparaiso in 1943 when the new Chilean government dropped out of the war, and Ronan was scuttled during the civil war in late 1944. Gobain was scrapped in 1948.

5.2.2. Naomh-Breandan-Class
As Thiaria’s minesweeper fleet expanded in the 1930s, more tenders were needed. The large salvage tugs of the Buabhall-type were considered a suitable basis, and a slightly lengthened version was adopted as minesweeper tender under the 1937 programme. Two each were laid down in 1938 and 1939 by the Longaon and Slatiascaigh yards, and completed in 1940 and 1941. They had the same performance as the large tugs and were considered excellent sea boats, capable of 18 knots; armament was two single 100mm DP guns and two twin 37mm/50 AA guns. They were named Naomh Breandan, Naomh Columban, Naomh Cainnech and Naomh Mobhi.
[ img ]

They received the usual upgrades during the war; by 1944, all had eight 20mm cannon and a full radar suite.
[ img ]

Columban was torpedoed by a Recherchean submarine in 1943; the other three survived the war and served as minesweeper tenders till the early 1980s with very few modifications. Cainnech as the last of her class was scrapped in 1988.

5.2.3. Naomh-Laisren-Class
Under wartime conditions, Thiaria’s warship yards could not deliver specialized hulls such as the Naomh-Breandan-Class anymore, because they had to mass-produce destroyers, submarines and escorts. To provide cheaper and simpler tenders for the ever-expanding fleet of minesweepers and the new force of MTBs, the wartime standard coaster type was modified, yielding the Naomh-Laisren-class. Eight coaster hulls were taken from the ongoing production programme at Loingshigh&Riain and Meara and completed as tenders in 1942 (2), 1943 and 1944 (3 each). They were named Naomh Laisren, Naomh Canice, Naomh Finnchhu, Naomh Begnait, Naomh Ruadhan, Naomh Ciaran, Naomh Senan and Naomh Ninnidh. They were capable of 12 knots and nowhere near as effective as the Breandans; they were armed with two 75mm DP guns and eight 20mm cannon. They had surface search radars for navigation and HF/DF, but no further electronics.
[ img ]

All were manned by naval militia personnel and used to service motor minesweepers (Laisren, Begnait, Ruadhan and Ninnidh) and MTBs (Canice, Finnchu, Ciaran and Senan). Begnait was wrecked in 1944, and Laisren was mined that year. Senan was sunk by an airstrike just before the allied conquest of New Portugal. The five survivors were converted for civilian use after the war and sold.

6. Transports

6.1. Ammunition ships
Of the Real-class freightliner, a total of 26 were completed under the war emergency building programme between 1942 and 1944, with six more incomplete by the end of 1945 and sixteen more already approved, but cancelled. Six (already mentioned under amphibious forces) were converted to Infantry landing ships, another six were taken over as ammunition transports. Their names were Sirrah, Agena, Toliman, Mimosa, Alnair and Suhail, built by Slatiascaigh (first three), CTS (next two) and CDO (Suhail) to a CTS standard design. Apart from ammunition, they also carried supplies, freshwater, food and spare parts and were fitted for underway transfer. They complemented the Eithne- and Nenui-class oilers, which only supplied fuel, to give Thiaria’s main battlefleet and amphibious formations strategic mobility (the fast combat support ships were exclusively assigned to the carrier strike force, with occasional exceptions for large raiding task forces).
[ img ]

Four of these were lost during the war, one by enemy air action in the battle of Meanhchiorcal, one by a British submarine, one by an accidental explosion and one during a botched boarding operation during civil war hostilities. Both survivors (Agena and Suhail) were demilitarized in 1947 and sold to a small civilian shipping line; they were renamed Trapailm and Traponc.
[ img ]

They were sold on to some African operator in the late 1960s and remained subject to rapidly changing ownership throughout the 1970s. Traponc (ex-Suhail) was wrecked with over a hundred casualties off Madagaskar in 1982, and Trapailm (ex-Agena) was scrapped in India in 1997.

6.2. Auxiliary air defence Ships
Another notable use of the Real-class freightliner were eight conversions to auxiliary air defence ships for convoy service. These vessels (their names were Achernar, Zaurak, Mirach, Antares, Fomalhaut, Atria, Alsephina and Naos) were among the last completed units of their class; all except Zaurak (CDO) were built by CTS, and none was available before mid-1943. The last two were completed so late in 1944 that they had no operational sorties. They were fitted with a complete cruiser-grade radar suite and the most modern fire-control systems available for a powerful anti-air armament of sixteen 100mm/45 guns in eight twin DP mounts, sixteen 37mm/70 autocannon in four quad turrets and 22 20mm cannon in eleven twin mounts.
[ img ]

These ships were of course no effective answer to the growing air threat against Thiaria’s lines of communication to continental South America, but their presence greatly boasted morale of convoy crews. Three (Zaurak, Mirach and Atria) were sunk, but none by air attack, all three falling victim to allied submarines. The five survivors were demilitarized after the war and sold, but none of them had such long lives as their half-sisters Trapailm and Traponc; the last one was broken up in 1961.

6.3. Troopships
A total of 15 passenger vessels were pressed into service as troopships in 1940/1, with another five completing at a later time. Of the former, four were captured allied hulls like Caerllion, the former Patagonian SS Southwatch Castle,
[ img ]

the others (including all new ones) were requisitioned Thiarian liners. These included five Ardri-class liners (already mentioned under amphibious forces) built by CTS, Riordan, CDO and Slatiascaigh and named Ardri Cinaed, Ardri Mael Sechnaill, Ardri Brian Boruma, Ardri Cathair Mor and Ardri Miall Noigiallach
[ img ]

and two vessels of the four-ship Aigean Atlantach-class, the largest passenger liners in Thiaria’s merchant fleet, which were completed in 1938 through 1941 by Riordan
[ img ]

and immediately taken over by the naval militia, half of them serving as troopships (Aigean Atlantach and Aigean Giuin) and the other two as hospital ships (see below).
[ img ]

Of the others, no two were alike; armament varied on all, and most only had rudimentary self-defence weaponry. A total of eight Thiarian troopships were lost during the war. All survivors were returned to civilian service afterwards, but Aigean Giuin was ceded to the Soviet Union and remained in service till 1977 in the Far East.

6.4. Miscellaneous transport vessels
The two most numerous types of Thiaria’s war emergency building programme were Riordan’s Togalai Gael-class general purpose bulk freighter and CDO’s An Triantan-class coaster. In addition to these ships, 29 enemy cargo vessels were captured intact, of which the eight largest ones were renamed and converted for amphibious warfare (see there); of the other 21, seven were converted to AMCs, six scrapped and eight employed for general supply duties by the Ministery of Transport.

6.4.1. Togalai-Gael-Class
Of this class, a total of 82 were completed between 1941 and 1945, half of them by the Riordan yard and half by Longaon. They were simple and robust ships with single-shaft VTE engines, capable of 18 knots, but still took more time and money to construct than the average US liberty ship (of which 30 were completed for each Thiarian hull!). They received the names of professions, followed by ‘Gael’, resulting in earthy names like ‘Gaelic Peasant’ or Gaelic Smith’ in the beginning, but sprouting somewhat funny results like ‘Gaelic Dentist’ or ‘Gaelic Haberdasher’ for later ships. Most were taken over by private shipping companies and chartered by the Ministery of the Navy throughout the war, but eight named Mianadoir Gael (Gaelic Miner), Togalai Gael (Gaelic Constructor), Measineoir Gael (Gaelic Machinist), Gabha Gael (Gaelic Smith), Siuineir Gael (Gaelic Carpenter), Tuiodoir Gael (Gaelic Thatcher), Buanai Gael (Gaelic Harvester) and Saor Gael (Gaelic Mason) were directly taken over by the Naval Militia and employed for general transport duties, mostly carrying spare parts and other non-perishable supplies. Unlike their civilian counterparts, they were uniformly armed with three single 100mm/45 DP guns and sixteen 20mm autocannon.
[ img ]

All others received makeshift armaments of old 65mm and 75mm HA guns and a variety of machineguns for self-defense. Some 50 survived the war, including five of the military variant, and served in ever-dwindling numbers until the 1980s all around South America, Africa and South-East Asia. Most initially served under the Thiarian flag, but all survivors were sold off to foreign buyers by 1970.
[ img ]

Although some enjoyed a very long life, none made it into the 21st century.

6.4.2. An Triantan-Class
These coasters were designed by CDO and built by CDO (24), Loinghshigh&Riain (17), Meara (13) and Payeur (10) between 1941 and 1944. They were powered by very primitive single-shaft compound steam engines and good for 12 knots. They were all named for mountains and employed pretty much the same way as the larger Togalai Gael type. Fourteen (Dhasleibhte (Twin Peaks), Bheinn Alainn (Beautiful Mountain), An Triantan (The Triangle), Droim Cocach (Pointy Ridge), Cnoic na Sheigh (Fairy Hills), Aillrite (Sheer Cliff), Mullachdubh (Black Summit), Garbhbarr (Stormy Top), An Pilear (The Pillar), Cluanairte (The Deceivers), Ardtobar (High Springs), Nead Creagach (Rocky Nest), Toinliath (Grey Buttocks) and Sliabh Snamha (Floating Mountain)) were taken over by the Navy upon completion and manned by naval militiamen; six were fitted with freezing equipment and employed as food transports, the rest for general transport duties. Their armament consisted of two single 75mm HA guns and four single 20mm cannon. Civilian vessels usually had one or two 65mm guns plus some machineguns.
[ img ]

Having been hastily welded together, these vessels did not last long after the war; the Navy sold her survivors forthwith, and the whole class was scrapped by 1965.

6.4.3. Captured ships
Eight captured transports – all of different types, all of them British or Patagonian – were armed with two or four 65mm guns and some 13mm AAMGs before re-commissioning. A typical example is the former Patagonian SS Shadowdale, renamed Srathdorcha.
[ img ]

Like all Thiarian auxiliaries operated by the Ministry of Transport, they were not camouflaged. Five of these vessels were still present after the war and returned to their former owners.

7. Tugs

7.1. Salvage ships

7.1.1. Buabhall-Class
In the early 1930s, the Navy identified a requirement for a heavy seagoing salvage tug able to bring in the largest warships in case of damage; if these were taken in tow by other warships, the towing ship could be quickly relieved and brought back into action. As this was hazardous duty, a large number of such tugs was needed, since they were expected to go if not in, but at least near harm’s way and take losses. Eight massive 1.250-ton tugs were ordered in 1934 to a Longaon-design, and that yard delivered them between 1936 and 1940 (one each in these years, two annually in the years in between). They were named for powerful non-predatory animals: Buabhall (Buffalo), Eilifint (Elephant), Dobhareach (Hippo), Sronbheannach (Rhino), Tarbh (Bull), Torc (Boar), Muc Fhaitneach (Warthog) and Bioson (Bison). They had twin-shaft diesel machinery for 14 knots speed and could tow a battleship at eight knots over a sustained period of time. Armament was a single 100mm/45 DP gun.
[ img ]

Two (Eilifint and Bioson) were completed as submarine salvage ships with ASDIC and deep-sea salvage gear. Like the other six, these were fitted with eight 20mm cannon in 1940/1 (getting them earlier than many true warships, some of which retained their 13mm AAMGS into 1942) and were among the first Thiarian auxiliaries to be fitted with radar, reflecting the importance of such units for the morale of the Thiarian submarine service. Two of the tugs (Sronbheannach and Muc Fhaitneach) were refitted to a similar standard in 1942 to match the expansion of the submarine fleet.
[ img ]

The other four remained salvage tugs; they also were quickly upgunned and equipped with radar. In 1943, all received the latest surface search set.
[ img ]

Ironically, although these vessels were very active throughout the war and saved countless ships and lives, the prediction of heavy losses proved false, and all emerged unscathed in 1945. Although they were personnel-intensive and expensive to operate, Eilifint and Sronbheannach remained in service into the 1980s, with their sisters being progressively cannibalized to keep them running.

7.2. Tugs

7.2.1. Coirneach-class
The Coast guard acquired eight Coirneach-class minesweepers after the war and converted them to salvage tugs, retaining their former names: Peileacan (Pelican), Piasun (Pheasant), Broigheall (Cormorant), Guardal (Petrel), Piongain (Penguin), Corr (Heron), Gealbhan (Sparrow) and Eamu (Emu).
[ img ]

They served as picket boat tenders throughout the war, being no longer considered oceangoing by 1940 standards, and received no modernizations. One was lost; the rest were scrapped after the war.

7.2.2. Dromadaire-class
Parallel to the acquisition of Seabhac-class minelayers by the Navy, the Coast Guard purchased twelve similar hulls for use as seagoing salvage tugs. Armed with a single 65mm gun, they had two rescue launches and two whalers for the same purpose. They were delivered between 1928 and 1933 and named for non-predatory animals: Dromadaire (Dromedary), Camall (Camel), Seabra (Zebra), Miuil (Mule), Rainneach (Hinny), Asal (Donkey), Capall (Horse), Ocaipe (Okapi), Damh (Ox), Biorbheannach (Antelope), Cangaru (Kangaroo) and Sioraf (Giraffe).
[ img ]

All were upgunned during the war, with a 75mm DP gun replacing the 65mm piece and up to sixteen 13mm AAMGs. They were manned by Coast Guard personnel throughout.
[ img ]

Three were lost during the war. The others resumed their coast guard service afterwards; some of them served until well into the 1970s. By 1980, all were scrapped.

7.2.3. Naomh-Odran-Class
Under the wartime construction programme, a simple yet robust oceangoing tug was designed by Loingshigh&Riain. Sixteen were laid down in 1942 (4), 1943 and 1944 (6 each), of which four were cancelled before being named late in 1944. They had single-shaft diesels, were good for 15 knots and carried a 75mm DP gun and sixteen 13mm AAMGs in four quad mounts; some late units had eight 20mm cannon instead. 12 were commissioned (two after the armistice) and named for Saints: Naomh Odran, Naomh Sarnait, Naomh Cathal, Naomh Aodhan, Naomh Tassach, Naomh Macdara, Naomh Blathmac, Naomh Faithleach, Naomh Lorcan, Naomh Derchairthinn, Naomh Adhamhnan and Naomh Scaithin.
[ img ]

This class was exceptionally long-lived; none were lost during the war, and all were modernized in the late 1950s for further service with radar, new 37mm mounts and contemporary communications gear.
[ img ]

No less than eight were still in service in 1990, and the last one was not decommissioned before 2005. By 2018, all have been scrapped.

7.2.4. Naomh Baithene-Class
The smaller seagoing tug type of the wartime construction programme comprised 36 units laid down in 1942, 1943 and 1944 (12 each) on sundry small private yards. Six were cancelled before being named in mid-1944, the others were named for Saints: Naomh Baithene, Naomh Muirchu, Naohm Colm Cille, Naomch Sechnall, Naomh Raoiriu, Naomh Banban, Naomh Samhtann, Naomh Comgall, Naomh Scuithin, Naomh Laisren, Naomh Diarmaid, Naomh Neachtain, Naomh Tigernach, Naomh Eogan, Naomh Modiuit, Naomh Cianan, Naomh Iarlaithe, Naomh Fachtna, Naomh Conainne, Naomh Bronach, Naomh Ultan, Naomh Fedelmid, Naomh Lua, Naomh Caomhnan, Naomh Abran, Naomh Gobnait, Naomh Cruithneachan, Naomh Fionnbharra, Naomh Damhaith and Naomh Caoimhin. They were armed with a 75mm DP gun and four 13mm AAMGs.
[ img ]

There were only four war losses; all 26 survivors were transferred to civilian ownership after the war.

8. Hospital ships
Thiaria requisitioned a total of 10 liners for service as hospital ships. These included three older, smaller Thiarian-built vessels, the Ardri-class liners Ardri Ruaidri and Ardri Muirchertach,
[ img ]

the Aigean-Atlantach-class liners Aigean Theas and Aigean Indiach,
[ img ]

and three different captured ex-allied ships, exemplified by the former Belgian liner Baudouinville, captured in June 1940 and retaining its original name.
[ img ]

Aigean Indiach was sunk in error by a Brazilian submarine in 1943 and the former S.S. Southwatch Castle quite deliberately by a Patagonian one late in 1941. All others were returned to civilian owners after the war.

9. Survey ships
Four survey vessels on the CTS small standard hull (the same as the Bauaine-class netlayers and the Tir-Parthas-class minelayers) were built in the mid-/late 1920s (one each year between 1925 and 1928) during Thiaria’s effort to gear up the performance of its shipbuilding industry for the expected major rearmament programme of the 1930s. Like the minelayers, they were named for Islands: Spiorad Naomh, Tir Sliceann, Naomh Pheadar and Eilean Deilf. They were originally armed with two 100mm/45 LA guns and four 8mm MGs.
[ img ]

The whole class was pre-fitted to be converted to escorts, and as soon as the war started, all four were quickly taken in hand on Navy yards and rebuilt with four 100mm/45 guns in twin DP mounts, four 37mm/50 AA guns, eight 13mm AAMGs in two quad mounts, two depth charge racks and two depth charge projectors. They also received a new tripod mast for a complete radar suite. Reconstruction was effected in sequence, and it took the whole class till late 1941 to re-emerge as escorts.
[ img ]

They were not very effective in that role due to their low speed of only 16 knots which made it hard for them to maneuver inside convoys and quickly react to threats; between them, they scored against a single submarine. Naomh Pheadar was sunk by a floating mine in the Rio de la Plata estuary in 1944. The other three survived the war and remained in Thiarian hands. Spiorad Naomh and Eilean Deilf were employed as ASW training vessels till 1961 and scrapped 1964/5; Tir Sliceann was already scrapped in 1952.

10. AMCs
During the war, Thiaria commissioned a total of eighteen cargo or freightliner hulls as armed merchant cruisers. All of them were captured or purchased; none was Thiarian-built, due to camouflage and mimicry requirements. No two were alike. Like Germany, Thiaria used her AMCs offensively as raiders, necessitating hidden armament and ruling out the use of passenger liners due to their suspicious size. Usually six or eight guns were mounted, ranging from newly produced 130mm destroyer guns (eight each on three ships) to stored 140mm guns – both 40-caliber pieces of 1890s vintage (eight on one ship and six each on four ships) and more contemporary WWI-vintage 55-caliber pieces (six on two ships and eight on five ships) – to 155mm/50 army guns (six on one ship) and 165mm/45 guns removed from scrapped armoured cruisers (six each on two ships). The total number of stored guns proved to be a major limiting factor. Secondary armament varied widely; anything between zero and four 65mm or 75mm AA guns and in some cases up to four 37mm autocannon were installed, plus up to twenty 13mm AAMGs. Most Thiarian AMCs had one triple torpedo set on either beam, usually old 450mm tubes removed from scrapped destroyers and placed upon new triple carriages, with between six and eighteen reload torpedoes stowed; in six AMCs, new 559mm torpedo tubes with twelve reloads were used instead. Most AMCs never received radars, although most had HF/DF. Up to three floatplanes could be carried in the holds – usual complement was two – but there were no catapults. Only five Thiarian AMCs were fitted with surface search radars. None ever had fire control radars or directors. Of the eighteen units converted, only eleven actually went raiding due to a lack of active navy crews; only three of those manned by the naval militia were ever sent on a raiding mission, the others being used as auxiliary convoy escorts. AMC raiding missions started by mid-1940 after conversion of six US-built units purchased from Thiarian and Argentine shipping companies and continued into the first half of 1943. Afterwards, increasing allied air cover rendered AMC missions impractical. A typical example of a Thiarian raider is Oilean Mhanann (named for the Isle of Man; most Thiarian raiders were named for Islands in the British Empire which the Thiarians considered Celtic property), built in the USA in 1933 and sold to a private Thiarian shipping line. Her lines were similar to many other US freighters. She was one of the most powerful Thiarian raiders and carried eight 140mm/55 guns, two new fully automatic 37mm cannon and sixteen 13mm AAMGs; six 559mm torpedo tubes and two floatplanes were carried, and radar was available from May 1943.
[ img ]

Oilean Mhanann carried out Thiaria’s last successful AMC raid (there were later ones, but none the AMC would survive) in August 1943 in the eastern Pacific, always the main operating area of Thiarian AMCs. With a total of 22 enemy merchants sunk or captured on three missions, Oilean Mhanann also was Thiaria’s most successful AMC (the total tally being 95 ships against nine AMCs lost). Two surviving raiders were used as training and accommodation ships after mid-1943.

This wraps Thiaria's WWII fleet (although the battleships and most cruisers are in dire need of reworking…).

Greetings
GD


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
manas001
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: December 20th, 2018, 9:22 pm
Offline
Posts: 10
Joined: August 25th, 2011, 9:23 pm
Another truly awesome set of drawings. I cant wait for 70's, 80's and modern drawings of Thiaria.


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
eswube
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: December 20th, 2018, 9:28 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 9080
Joined: June 15th, 2011, 8:31 am
Contact: Website
Totally awesome work!

_________________
My very neglected Deviantart page


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
yurchenko
Post subject: Re: Thiaria: RebootPosted: December 20th, 2018, 9:30 pm
Offline
Posts: 91
Joined: July 3rd, 2014, 8:19 pm
Location: Odesa, Ukraine
Great work!!! :)


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Display: Sort by: Direction:
[Post Reply]  Page 33 of 35  [ 344 posts ]  Return to “Alternate Universe Designs” | Go to page « 131 32 33 34 35 »

Jump to: 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], jongarhan and 14 guests


The team | Delete all board cookies | All times are UTC


cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited
[ GZIP: Off ]