Moderator: Community Manager
[Post Reply] [*]  Page 2 of 6  [ 51 posts ]  Go to page « 1 2 3 4 5 6 »
Author Message
Schlemm138
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 9th, 2021, 5:17 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 17
Joined: May 19th, 2019, 10:53 am
Location: Barnegat, NJ
The stern of the Gulflander is based on the actual Edison Chouest OSV, in this case the Kellie Chouest. The stern has a platform aft that lowers to be able to launch watercraft from the stern. I agree that it looks weird as hell, but that's the way it's depicted in the general arrangement drawing.

As for the shading, I probably need to get better at it and go back and redo it, but at this point I doubt I'll have any time.

Thanks for the compliment on it. I appreciate it.

https://www.alamy.com/the-kellie-choues ... d0%26pl%3d

_________________
A.K.A. Das_Schlemm
[ img ]


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
heuhen
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 9th, 2021, 7:15 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 8635
Joined: December 15th, 2010, 10:13 pm
Location: Behind you, looking at you with my mustache!
Schlemm138 wrote: *
The stern of the Gulflander is based on the actual Edison Chouest OSV, in this case the Kellie Chouest. The stern has a platform aft that lowers to be able to launch watercraft from the stern. I agree that it looks weird as hell, but that's the way it's depicted in the general arrangement drawing.

As for the shading, I probably need to get better at it and go back and redo it, but at this point I doubt I'll have any time.

Thanks for the compliment on it. I appreciate it.

https://www.alamy.com/the-kellie-choues ... d0%26pl%3d
but not like that, it have a normal hull that you find on offshore vessel's, with a small extension to it stern and the lines are smother, you want to have the water flow smoothly past the hull.


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Garlicdesign
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 9th, 2021, 8:03 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 1032
Joined: December 26th, 2012, 9:36 am
Location: Germany
Hi all!

Abhainn-/Chevallier-Class Fast Fleet Support Ship

After the second World War, Thiaria had to cede most of her warships, but retained much of her support fleet. There was however one remarkable exception. Together with the Germans, they had pioneered one-stop replenishment at sea, using a single ship type to carry both liquid and dry stores. This approach had worked remarkably well and provided the Thiarian fleet with a kind of staying power all out of proportion to its modest size. Therefore, all remaining fast fleet support ships were confiscated upon armistice and divided between the victors. To support their remaining warships, the Thiarians were down to four River-class tankers, which had been designed to civilian specifications, and a few ammunition ships based on civilian freightliners. Due to the cut-down size of the fleet, this would be enough for the time being. Blue-water aspirations in the early sixties led to the acquisition of two used Essex-Class carriers in the USA, but replenishment capabilities were not augmented before Thiaria’s flirt with communism after 1966, which put all fleet expansion plans on hold for the next eight years. By the mid-70s, the fleet was quite run-down, but the ongoing oil-boom allowed not only for the purchase of new warships, but also for a new support fleet. At that point, Thiaria opted for a mixed fleet of replenishment oilers and dry stores ships, four of each type; all were based upon contemporary French designs (Durance- and Jules-Verne-Classes). This programme was complete by the mid-1980s.

Unfortunately, the oilers, whose design was rated highly satisfactory, were single-hulled, which was perfectly OK in the 1970s, but became outlawed during the 2000s for safety reasons. Moreover, the Thiarian fleet was not satisfied with the dry stores ships, whose design dated back to the mid-60s and who lacked rapid transfer gear. Although the French oilers were retrofitted to transfer dry stores, the hull configuration could not be changed, so both navies were asked to replace their replenishment oilers by 2005, despite all being in good material shape. Both navies were in agreement that their future replenishment ships were to be of the combined, single-stop type; the French had already made that step with the Durance’s retrofit, and the Thiarians considered six dual-purpose replenishment ships a cheaper solution than four each tankers and dry stores carriers. A first basic design for a successor vessel was drawn up in 2006 in France under the designation BRAVE; it was chosen as baseline for a joint design and considerably enlarged and upgraded. The final design was approved in 2010, at a time when the extant replenishment ships were to be phased out already; they had to be operated with special permissions after 2010, which were repeatedly challenged by lawsuits from environmental organizations. That year, a contract for construction of eleven hulls was struck: Six for Thiaria, four for France and one for Argentina (the latter was cancelled in 2014 for financial reasons). Many fittings were jointly produced for both navies, and the sheer size of the project allowed for some economy of scale; unit cost could be limited to € 250 million despite design’s size and capability. The first hull was laid down in mid-2012 at Corcaigh, to be followed by one more every year, divided between the SCI- and Riordan-yards. Projected gestation time was four years per hull; the usual delays nearly doubled that for the class ship, which was commissioned early in 2019, and the sixth Thiarian ship was laid down as late as 2020. These delays require the Thiarian Durance-class oilers to be operated for an average of 40 years; two are currently still in service, alongside two of the new units, with a third undergoing acceptance trials. To bridge the gap, two civilian tankers have been leased in 2018 for eight years and fitted with refuelling gear removed from retired Durance-class vessels. Construction of the first French ship commenced in 2014; it was completed early in 2021 and will be commissioned around year’s end. The others will follow in two-year intervals; so far, the project is proceeding on schedule, although the French building pace is slower to begin with. The Thiarian Navy named their ships for rivers:

Ship / Pennant (laid down / launched / completed / commissioned)
Liathui / L44 (2012/2015/2018/2019)
Siorrad / L45 (2013/2016/2018/2019)
Sirannui / L46 (2016/2018/2020/2021)
Teabhainn / L47 (2017/2019/2021/2022)
Foire / L48 (2019/2021/2023/2024)
Cliud / L49 (2020/2022/2024/2025)

The French Navy named their ships for notable marine engineers.

Ship / Pennant (laid down / launched / completed / commissioned)
Jacques Chevallier / A625 (2014/2017/2020/2021)
Jacques Stosskopf / A626 (2016/2019/2022/2023)
Émile Bertin / A627 (2018/2021/2024/2025)
Gustave Zédé / A628 (2020/2023/2026/2027)

These double-hulled vessels comply with every relevant safety regulation and can operate worldwide without restrictions. They are built to military standards and have a certain amount of compartmentation, and very extensive damage control facilities. The originally planned heavy self-defence armament (the Thiarians wanted to mount a total of 64 VLS cells for VL-Mica and Polyphem missiles, plus four 30mm cannon) was axed during the construction process; the Thiarian ships now only mount two Millennium CIWS and four 13mm HMGs to deal with asymmetric threats. The relatively advanced electronics including an S-band 3D-radar and a full ESM suite were however retained. A considerable degree of automation kept crew requirements small, although it is still larger than on many contemporary replenishment vessels due to the relatively complex diesel-electric powerplant, which is capable of 24 knots. In this respect, these vessels are superior to every other European design and more properly comparable to the bigger US Supply-Class or Chinese Type 901, and the smaller Japanese/Kokoan Mashu-Class, currently being the largest and fastest replenishment ship type without gas turbine propulsion. They are not normally assigned a permanent helicopter but can accommodate one Znamenany Foiche heavy transport helicopter or two Caracals for VERTREP operations; the former is more usual, and the class ship LT Liathui has already carried two Foiches (one in the hangar and one on the pad) for prolonged operations. They are the only Thiarian ship class which regularly operate the heaviest helicopter in Thiaria’s inventory. As the French are among the Znamenany’s export customers for the Foiche, they will also operate Foiches from their Chevallier-Class replenishment ships. Like their predecessors, the French ships are equipped as command ships, which the Thiarian vessels are not. Both versions carry extensive medical facilities including operating and X-Ray rooms. For their primary job, they carry two double fuel transfer gantries, one stern refuelling position, two large and two small cranes; they carry two service boats and two RIHBs. Inflatable rescue floats for 240 persons are provided (on top of the hangar, in double rows). Their technical data are:

Displacement: 25.500 ts normal, 40.500 ts maximum
Dimensions: Length 213,00 m, Beam 27,00 m, Draught 8,50 m normal, 11,50 m maximum
Propulsion: Diesel-Electric; 2 OSD E-195 diesel generators, powered by 4 Nairn D42N-4 diesels (80.000 shp)
Speed: 24 knots maximum at normal displacement, 22 knots maximum fully loaded, 20 knots sustainable fully loaded
Range: 15.000 nm @ 18 kts
Crew: 150 (including 40 medical staff) + berthing for another 80
Armament: 2x 35mm Millennium Gun CIWS, 4x 13mm HMG, 8 water cannon for firefighting and as nonlethal weapons, hangar for 1x Foiche or 2x Caracal helicopters, helipad
Capacity: 12.000 m³ liquid stores (Diesel, Jet Fuel, Water, Lubricants), 3.000 m³ dry stores (incl. 250 m³ refrigerated), 16 containers

[ img ]

The class ship LT Liathui was commissioned on April 10th, 2019 and achieved FOC on October 1st, 2020. Her first deployment – accompanying a carrier battlegroup around LT Andraimeide – brought her into the Indian Ocean for joint exercises with Indian and Recherchean forces in demonstrative proximity of Lemurian waters.

Cheers
GD


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Soode
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 3:32 am
Offline
Posts: 8
Joined: December 25th, 2020, 10:45 pm
BHBK-1461 Anchungang

[ img ]

General characteristics:
Type: Fast combat support ship
Length: 224.6 meters overall, 209.1 meters between perpendiculars
Beam: 31.4 meters
Draught: 11.3 meters (full load)
Propulsion: COGAG, 4x LM2500+G4 gas turbine, 35,320 kW each
Speed: 25 knots
Boats: 2x RHIB
Complement: 40 officers, 367 enlisted crew
Sensors and processing systems: 1x HR-171 3D air search radar
Electronic warfare and decoys:
  • 2x JJ-8 ESM antenna
  • 4x JJ-7 ECM antenna
  • 4x Baram-2 chaff/smoke launcher
  • 2x Manhwagyŏng-H torpedo decoy launcher
  • 2x D-105 datalink
Armament:
  • Mark 41 VLS (8 cells, self-defense length, for quadpacked YDG-66 SAM)
  • 2x GBM-23/5 Bulkkot CIWS
Aircraft carried: 3x Gyundoan-Han GH-36 Mulsuri compound helicopter

Overview:

The Anchungang class is a type of fast combat support ship built in Menghe for the Menghean Navy. During the design and development process, they were assigned the designation Plan 1650. Four ships were commissioned between 2018 and 2021, and each is assigned to one of the Menghean Navy's carrier battle groups. Compared with the preceding Yŏngjŏnggang-class replenishment ships, these vessels have a larger fuel, water, and dry goods capacity, and they can more easily keep up with fast-moving ship formations. They also carry YDG-66 surface-to-air missiles for self-defense against missiles and aircraft.

Replenishment capability:

The Anchungang-class ships are designed to conduct underway replenishment of carrier battle groups and anti-submarine battle groups. Depending on mission requirements, they can either accompany a battle group and transfer stored supplies as needed; take on supplies at a friendly port, sprint to the battle group, and resupply it directly; or take on bulk supplies from a dedicated fleet oiler or solid goods transport ship, and then distribute them to ships in the battle group. Because the Menghean Navy tends to operate close to friendly ports on long patrols, the second approach is most common.

There are a total of 11 alongside replenishment stations on the Anchungang-class ships: six on the port side, and five on the starboard side. Because Menghean aircraft carriers conduct replenishment from their starboard side, the asymmetric layout speeds up carrier refueling. The four dry goods transfer cranes, mounted at points 1, 2, 7, and 8, move ammunition, supplies, and personnel in suspended seats or stretchers. The seven hose rigs, mounted at points 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11, transfer bunker fuel, multipurpose ship fuel, aviation fuel, and fresh water, each one through a dedicated hose.

To refuel ships without dedicated alongside replenishment equipment, the Anchungang-class ships can also trail a hose in the water over the stern. A ship following behind can then recover this hose and connect it to a refueling pipe forward of the superstructure. This arrangement takes longer to set up, and can only be conducted at slower speeds, but it is the only way to refuel certain missile craft and coastal patrol ships.

To speed up the transfer of goods, or to resupply at longer distances, the Anchungang-class fast combat support ships also have vertical replenishment capabilities. Each ship has hangar space for three Gyundoan-Han GH-36 Mulsuri compound helicopters, usually the unarmed utility variant, which can move personnel and light supplies in the passenger compartment or carry heavier cargo pallets from a suspended sling. The large helicopter landing pad leaves ample space to line up cargo pallets for transfer, and GH-28 helicopters from the receiving ship can also be pressed into VERTREP service.

Armament and countermeasures:
Because the Anchungang-class fast combat support ships are meant to accompany carrier battle groups operating in contested waters, they are fitted with a relatively strong defensive suite. On top of the main pyramid mast is a 3D AESA air search radar under a radar-transparent dome. This can detect fixed-wing aircraft at a range of 80 kilometers, or sea-skimming targets at a range of slightly over 30 kilometers. The ship is also fitted with two D-105 datalinks to receive targeting information from nearby Menghean warships and aircraft.

The onboard electronic warfare suite consists of two JJ-8 passive ESM radomes and four JJ-7 active ECM radomes. As on other Menghean ships equipped with this system, the JJ-8 antenna can detect incoming anti-ship missiles by their active radar emissions and automatically cue JJ-7 radomes to jam the missile in the same frequency. As a second line of defense, four Baram-2 chaff and flare projectors can deploy IR- and radar-absorbent smoke in the path of the missile, and four heavy decoy projectors can drop floating decoys alongside the ship.

Hardkill missile defense consists of two GBM-23/5 Bulkkot close-in weapon system mounts, one on top of the hangar and one on the forecastle deckhouse. This is the same CIWS armament as the Yŏngjŏnggang-class replenishment ships. The main improvement over the preceding class comes in the installation of four self-defense-length Mark 41 VLS cells forward of the bridge. These can be loaded with quadpacked YDG-66 surface-to-air missiles, for a total of 32 missiles. Based on the Hallian CAMM missile, the vertically launched YDG-66G has a range of 25 kilometers and good accuracy, and greatly improves the ship's ability to intercept anti-ship missiles.

The Anchungang-class fast combat support ships carry no anti-submarine armament, but they are fitted with two Manhwagyŏng-H torpedo countermeasure launchers. These traversing box launchers each carry twelve launch tubes, each one containing an undersea seducer and jammer which generates false targets and interferes in the sonar system of wake-following torpedoes. The Anchungang-class ships do not carry any hull-mounted sonar, so they must generally rely on an accompanying escort ship to alert them about incoming torpedoes and transfer datalink information. Alternatively, an Anchungang-class ship can trail a short-range torpedo warning sonar over the stern, though this reduces their top speed.

Propulsion:
The preceding Yŏngjŏnggang-class ships were relatively slow, with a top speed of 20 knots. This was adequate for most replenishment operations, but it meant that if a carrier had to operate at full speed for an extended period of time, the replenishment ship could fall behind. To correct for this problem, the Anchungang-class fast combat support ships were fitted with four General Electric LM2500+G4 gas turbine engines in a COGAG arrangement similar to that used on the Haeju-class destroyers. The turbines are staggered across two watertight compartments, resulting in an asymmetric two-funnel layout.

At full power, the Anchungang-class ships can maintain a speed of 25 knots, three knots shy of the conventionally-powered Sibiwŏl Hyŏgmyŏng class aircraft carriers. This higher speed also reduces the transit time between a friendly port and a battle group.

Ships in the class:
The Menghean Navy ordered a total of four Anchungang-class fast combat support ships in 2015. As of early 2021, all have been completed and are in service.

Like their predecessors, the four ships of the Anchungang class are named for Menghean rivers.
  • BHBK-1461 Anchungang: laid down 2015-09-27, launched 2017-01-19, commissioned 2018-12-04.
  • BHBK-1462 Okgang: laid down 2016-04-03, launched 2017-11-04, commissioned 2019-06-01.
  • BHBK-1463 Ryanggang: laid down 2017-01-22, launched 2018-05-07, commissioned 2020-01-06.
  • BHBK-1464 Songgang: laid down 2017-11-06, launched 2019-04-13, commissioned 2021-02-27.

_________________
A bad peace is preferable to a terrible war.


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Kiwi Imperialist
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 7:00 am
Offline
Posts: 156
Joined: December 10th, 2014, 9:38 am
Challenge Extension
Some members of our community have expressed interest in an extension to the modern auxiliary challenge. I have chosen to extend the submission period 48 hours so that participants now have the entire weekend to complete their work. The challenge will now run until the 13th of June, ending at 23:59 UTC-12 (Countdown Timer).


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
thegrumpykestrel
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 9:50 am
Offline
Posts: 76
Joined: March 28th, 2017, 5:59 am
Location: Middle of Woop Woop
River (III) -Class Replenishment Tanker

With the sweeping modernisation plan of the Royal Westralian Navy having begun in the early 2000s, the RWN's two rapidly aging River (II) -class tankers were forced into retirement without replacement in the mid-2000s; the RWN relying on commercial tankers and the support of allied navies' replenishment fleets to meet their needs. However, from the beginning it was recognised as a half-measure solution, and a replacement class was in the process of being planned. Unfortunately, the new River (III) -class program was plagued by bureaucratic and political problems, as some argued a replacement class was an unnecessary expenditure, with the role able to be filled by external contractors and other nations. Delays, and at one point even the threat of cancellation, were the norm for the program, and it was not until 2014 any real progress was made.

At this point, the program was effectively reset, and the procurement process reformed. Designs from a number of companies, both Westralian and internationally based, were fielded. Ultimately, the design pitched by NWS in collaboration with DSME in South Korea and Rolls Royce in the UK was selected. Notably, the design incorporated a number of efficiency increasing measures, many of which were shared with the RNZN's new oiler HMNZS Aotearoa. With the NWS shipyards focused on the construction of the new Air Warfare Frigates and the refit of the Batch I Broome-class GP frigates, the work of building the ships was given to Westralian commercial shipbuilders Campbell Maritime Services. Despite this being their first military contract work, CMS was experienced in the management and construction of large vessels, and the build process went smoothly. The first of the tankers entered service in March 2020, with the following being commissioned in April 2021.

[ img ]

General Characteristics
Displacement: 27 800 tons
Length: 181m
Beam: 24.9m
Draught: 8.38m
Propulsion: CODLOD - 2x ≈7500kw Wärtsilä main engines, 4 x ≈1710kw Wärtsilä diesel generators
Speed: 19kts
Range: 10000nmi
Crew: 61 core, up to 134 expanded
Armament: 1 x Raytheon RAM Mk31 Block 2 GMWS, 1 x Zuytdorp ZM35N 35mm, 4 x Browning M2 12.7mm MG, small arms
Capacity: 9000m³ liquid stores, 700m³ dry stores including 100m³ refrigerated space, 12 containers


Last edited by thegrumpykestrel on June 13th, 2021, 7:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
[Profile] [Quote]
superboy
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 2:44 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 542
Joined: July 5th, 2013, 7:09 am
Location: Thailand
Contact: Website
MV-47 Class: Midget Submarine Tender

10 June 2016, Shin Yang Shipping (Malaysia) has signed to sell a Multi-Purpose Vessel to Cambodia, for support 26 m midget submarines base on YOGO Class built by North Korea (electricity, water, fuel, air, steam, MGT-1 400 mm torpedo). MV Pailin launched 20 September 2018, sea trials 18 January 2019, Commissioned 1 June 2020.

The vessel will ensure the following missions:

- Submarine Tender
- Coastal and deep-sea scientific research and studies (hydrography, oceanography)
- Mine hunting
- Fishing control
- Surveillance of the Exclusive Economic Zone
- Assistance and supplies to other boats
- Helicopter winching operation
- Towing of ships

[ img ]

Specifications:

Displacement: 432 tons
Length: 47.56 m
Beam: 9.21 m
Draught: 2.36 m
Propulsion: 2xDiesel Engines 2,540 kW, 2xShafts
Max Speed: 16 knots
Range: 2,600 nautical miles
Crew: 27+10 Personnel and Scientific staff

Armament:

1x2M-3 25 mm twin gun
2xM2 12.7 mm single guns

++++++++


Last edited by superboy on June 12th, 2021, 7:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Schlemm138
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 8:27 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 17
Joined: May 19th, 2019, 10:53 am
Location: Barnegat, NJ
[ img ]

I know there's been some concerns about my hull form, especially the stern. I'll be the first to admit I may not have represented this correctly because I'm not gifted below the waterline. This is a snippet of the general arrangement drawing I was working from. The stern has a 65 ton "elevator" that watercraft can launch and recover to.

_________________
A.K.A. Das_Schlemm
[ img ]


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
WesleyWestland
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 9:00 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 18
Joined: March 23rd, 2020, 8:36 pm
NS Assistance, Westlandian naval auxiliary (1987)

[ img ]

NS Assistance is a powerful tugboat and firefighting vessel in service with the Westlandian Navy. She was built in 1987 by the F. Turner Shipyard in Chippington, and entered service as an ocean-going tugboat with Townsend Towing & Salvage Ltd. Her two powerful Atkinson-Fox V12 diesels made her well-suited to towing heavy oil rigs, as well as salvage work. Eventually, however, her lack of steerable propellers meant that she could not be used as an anchor handling tug and she was put up for sale in 1997. She was sold to the Westlandian coast guard for use as a salvage tug and rescue vessel and operated out of Pinwich until 2010, when she was replaced by a purpose-built rescue vessel. She was then acquired by the Westlandian navy, who used her as a salvage tug, firefighting vessel and occasional research ship. Her 1A ice rating also allowed the navy to use her on resupply runs to the remote stations at Mathildeland and Raleigh Island.

In recent years, however, she is most often seen accompanying the fleet on training exercises. The nation's aging flagship, aircraft carrier NS Illustrious, has suffered frequent breakdowns while she awaits a long overdue replacement of her steam turbines and boilers with modern diesel engines. Taking no chances, the navy appointed Assistance to be her constant companion, and she's towed Illustrious back to port one more than one occasion (I'd say that counts as a fleet auxiliary).

A few (estimated) numbers:
Length: 70.0 m.
Beam: 13.5 m.
Draught: 5.0 m.
Tonnage: 2000 GT.
Top speed: 18.5 knots.
Propulsion: 2x 7500 hp Atkinson-Fox V12, propellers with Kort nozzles.
Bollard pull: 140 tonnes.
"Armament": 7x remotely operated firefighting monitors. :D

_________________
I am colourblind, so please let me know if my colours are off.


Last edited by WesleyWestland on June 13th, 2021, 1:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
[Profile] [Quote]
heuhen
Post subject: Re: Modern Auxiliary ChallengePosted: June 11th, 2021, 10:51 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 8635
Joined: December 15th, 2010, 10:13 pm
Location: Behind you, looking at you with my mustache!
I haven't drawn anything, but I have something I updated quite a bit and made multiple version of for my AU

L3 class Standard

The L3 class was a series of ships in Caledonia Navy, you could get the L-class in L3, L6, L9 and L10 version. The L3 class was the most numerous of in the support fleet. all Naval bases, small or big bases, had a least 1 or more of them, even the military and air-force had some together with the Navy.

You could get them as: cargo ships, transport, workshop, local command, hospital, tug, etc.

Cargo: version was either with small wheelhouse or large wheelhouse. Large wheelhouse was ment for more longer operations distance or if the ship is working as a replenishment ship for one of the far away island and need capacity to transport passenger as well.
Transport/workshop/General purpose: it had an enclosed deck that could be modified for various missions, sometimes they was also used as school ship.
Local command: operated closer to land and controlled smaller battle area, these ships would also be equipped with an improved protection system, like Kevlar, steal plates, etc. They could also work as an relay up to the main command ship in large operation, like for example multiple beach landing operations:
Hospital/Medic/MEDEVAC/MASH: close to frontline units, loved by the soldiers during landing operation, where the normal hospital ship would be far out at sea, this ship is operating much closer and extending the range for MEDEVAC-helicopters. Increasing the survival of the average soldier.
Tug: it is not a full-blood tug, but it was more ment as a vessel that did more general things, like: pulling a target, or being used directly after an landing operation by moving in docks, to the beach, for faster unloading. These ships was armored to withstand most weapons against them, they was protected against splinter, 20mm ammunition, and in some areas was protected against 56+mm grenades, they had also several layers of armor and engine room and engine boxed in, they was on top of that, more compartet up in watertight compartment then usual. giving them the ability to survive even if they got damaged to an extend.


Design

Build on a well proven, deep hulled and very strong steal hull, there was done very little change from the original design, except adjusting it for Navy's need, that include adding special air-filters, and presuraced interior, but not at front line standards, except medic/MEDEVAC ship.


Cargo-version with small wheelhouse (main contender for the challenge):
[ img ]




Other versions:
Cargo with enlarged bridge:
[ img ]

transport/workshop/General purpose ship/etc.:
[ img ]

Local command:
[ img ]

Hospital/Medic/MEDEVAC/MASH:
[ img ]

Cargo-tug/target-tug/landing operation tug? (towing and placing temporary docks):
[ img ]


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Display: Sort by: Direction:
[Post Reply]  Page 2 of 6  [ 51 posts ]  Return to “Drawing Challenges” | Go to page « 1 2 3 4 5 6 »

Jump to: 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: manas001 and 2 guests


The team | Delete all board cookies | All times are UTC


cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited
[ GZIP: Off ]